Caravan engulfed in flames on Eglinton Road WA

  • A caravan engulfed in flames took WA firefighters half an hour to extinguish
  • Footage captured by onlookers shows the vehicle consumed by the harsh fire 
  • The blaze caused $65,000 of damage on the roadside in Eglinton near Perth 

Fiona Connor For Daily Mail Australia

A caravan engulfed in flames on the side of a highway took firefighters half an hour to extinguish after rushing to contain the blaze.   

Footage captured by onlookers shows the vehicle consumed by the harsh fire at Marmion Ave near the Eglinton turn off approximately 30 kilometres outside of Perth

Dark grey smoke is seen billowing from the gutted caravan wreck as the flames devastate the mobile home around 5pm on Monday.

A caravan (pictured) engulfed in flames took firefighters half an hour to extinguish

A caravan (pictured) engulfed in flames took firefighters half an hour to extinguish

A caravan (pictured) engulfed in flames took firefighters half an hour to extinguish

Footage captured by onlookers shows the vehicle consumed by the harsh fire

Footage captured by onlookers shows the vehicle consumed by the harsh fire

Footage captured by onlookers shows the vehicle consumed by the harsh fire

The explosion caused around $65,000 of damage despite the firefighters efforts to minimsise the destruction. 

In a second video, the caravan is engulfed in flames before a small explosion occurs sending a rush of fire into the air.

 The cause of the fire remains unknown.

The blaze caused around $65,000 of damage after the firefighters efforts

The blaze caused around $65,000 of damage after the firefighters efforts

The blaze caused around $65,000 of damage after the firefighters efforts

Warriors trample over the Cavaliers in front of their…

Press Association

Kevin Durant and Steph Curry carried the Golden State Warriors to their 13th on-the-road win in a row with a 118-108 victory over the Cleveland Cavaliers.

The 2017 NBA finalists met on Cavaliers’ home turf, although it failed to give the hosts what they needed to avoid losing to the champions for a second time this season.

LeBron James scored 32, but then so did Durant, and Curry added 23 in the Martin Luther King Day clash that ended Cleveland’s 13 home game winning streak.

Cleveland Cavaliers forward LeBron James (AP file/Charles Krupa)

Cleveland Cavaliers forward LeBron James (AP file/Charles Krupa)

Cleveland Cavaliers forward LeBron James (AP file/Charles Krupa)

There was cause for celebration for the Cavaliers’ Jeff Green, however, who scored his 10,000th career point.

Oklahoma City’s Russell Westbrook was ejected after complaining about being picked up for travelling, however his 19 points and 16 rebounds still helped the Thunder on their way to a 95-88 win over Sacramento Kings.

The hosts rallied from 15 down after the first half, with Carmelo Anthony and Paul George scoring 18, ending a three-game skid.

Lou Williams scored 31 and Blake Griffin 29 for the Los Angeles Clippers in their 113-92 win over the Houston Rockets, their fifth victory in a row.

The New York Knicks bounced back from defeat to the New Orleans Pelicans on Sunday with a 119-104 win over local rivals the Brooklyn Nets.

In Washington the Wizards succumbed to the Milwaukee Bucks for the second time in 10 days, losing 104-95 after Giannis Antetokounmpo scored 27 and took a career high of 20 rebounds.

The Memphis Grizzlies celebrated a 123-114 win over the Los Angeles Lakers, their first defeat in four games.

And Joel Embiid scored 34 and had 11 rebounds as the Philadelphia 76ers beat the Toronto Raptors 117-111.

In Atlanta the Hawks fended off the San Antonio Spurs 102-99, while the Chicago Bulls beat Miami Heat 119-111 to end the Floridians’ seven-game winning streak.

The Detroit Pistons lost 107-118 to the Charlotte Hornets and Utah Jazz were beaten 109-94 by the Indiana Pacers.

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Male tennis stars threaten to sit out Australian Open

A potential boycott by male players of next year’s Australian Open was among the more radical ideas floated at the ATP meeting taken over by Novak Djokovic prior to this fortnight’s event.

As the season’s first Grand Slam began, more details emerged of the contentious annual player gathering on Friday – first revealed by Sportsmail on Monday – in which he proposed a body to purely represent players’ interests.

He was accompanied by a lawyer specialising in employment disputes, who is said to have pointed out that it would be easier to withhold labour in Australia than it is in the other Grand Slam nations of the UK, USA and France.

Novak Djokovic took over ATP meeting, where ideas were discussed, ahead of Australian Open

Novak Djokovic took over ATP meeting, where ideas were discussed, ahead of Australian Open

Novak Djokovic took over ATP meeting, where ideas were discussed, ahead of Australian Open

A boycott by male players of next year’s Australian Open was among the more radical ideas

A boycott by male players of next year’s Australian Open was among the more radical ideas

A boycott by male players of next year’s Australian Open was among the more radical ideas

Kevin Anderson, Vice-President of the ATP Player Council, confirmed on Monday that Djokovic made a surprise address to the meeting, and that others responded from the floor. That came after all non-players were asked to leave the room by the Serb, who is currently the Council’s President.

The former world number one was expected to discuss the issue earlier on Tuesday after he made his playing comeback at Melbourne Park, which has been abuzz with the possible ramifications of a new players’ union.

The ATP hierarchy were holding their fire, as were some of the players, many aware that millionaire tennis folk lobbying for more money is not a an easy sell.

We are still a long way from the realistic prospect of a boycott of Melbourne or anywhere else, but it is clear that there is considerable support for Djokovic’s broader ideas, however they are packaged.

Kevin Anderson, vice-president of ATP player council, confirmed Djokovic made an address

Kevin Anderson, vice-president of ATP player council, confirmed Djokovic made an address

Kevin Anderson, vice-president of ATP player council, confirmed Djokovic made an address

One of them is to persuade tournaments to allocate a greater percentage of their revenues to prize money, and there is little question that tennis lags behind many other sports in this regard. In the case of the Grand Slams (which operate as separate entities to the ATP Tour) this can be under ten per cent.

More obviously contentious would be the suggestion that they deserve a greater slice of the pie than their female counterparts, although there is little question that some male players feel this way.

Djokovic himself tackled this thorny subject at Indian Wells in 2016, after tournament director Ray Moore stated that women should be ‘down on their knees’ in gratitude for the men ‘carrying the sport’.

The Serb abhorred the language used, and stressed his admiration for female colleagues, but said the men, ‘should fight for more because the stats are showing that we have much more spectators on the men’s tennis matches. I think that’s one of the reasons why maybe we should get awarded more.

We're a long way from a boycott but it is clear there is support for Djokovic’s broader ideas

We're a long way from a boycott but it is clear there is support for Djokovic’s broader ideas

We’re a long way from a boycott but it is clear there is support for Djokovic’s broader ideas

‘Women should fight for what they think they deserve, and we should fight for what we think we deserve.’

Gilles Simon, the influential French player and ATP Council member, restricted himself to saying on Monday that people should check his answers of four years ago. Back then he stated that men should earn more than the women.

Anderson was diplomatic and recognised that many players were well paid but said, ‘there’s still room for improvement and I think that’s what we are all fighting for.’

He also insisted that a major motivation was a desire to improve pay for players down towards 200 in the rankings.

But there was a more blunt assessment from some of the rank and file players. Djokovic’s compatriot Viktor Troicki told Serbian media: ‘Novak is right. The Grand Slams are raising prize money, but percentage wise, their income gets bigger and bigger. They are telling us fairy-tales and then it turns out we are hungry for money.

American Ryan Harrison was in favour of a body purely looking out for players’ interests

American Ryan Harrison was in favour of a body purely looking out for players’ interests

American Ryan Harrison was in favour of a body purely looking out for players’ interests

‘Players’ union is a good idea, only united will we have the power to really achieve something. When you look at what Grand Slams earn, what players are getting paid is ridiculous.’

American Ryan Harrison was also in favour of a body purely looking out for players’ interests, rather than the current partnership with tour events.

‘As far as the players’ union goes, I think it would be good to have because in a sense the only people that represent us are also representing the tournaments,’ he said. ‘If you look at the amount of prize money there is in other sports, we make really good money in tennis but at the same time, from a professional athlete’s standpoint, it’s not the way that it could be compared with others.

‘If you see an NBA [basketball] player or an NFL [American football] player you think seven figures in their bank account and I don’t think that’s the case even for [some players who] make the main draw at Grand Slams.’  

Lifelike robots made in Hong Kong meant to win over humans

David Hanson envisions a future in which AI-powered robots evolve to become “super-intelligent genius machines” that might help solve some of mankind’s most challenging problems.

If only it were as simple as that.

The Texas-born former sculptor at Walt Disney Imagineering and his Hong Kong-based startup Hanson Robotics are combining artificial intelligence with southern China’s expertise in toy design, electronics and manufacturing to craft humanoid “social robots” with faces designed to be lifelike and appealing enough to win trust from humans who interact with them.

In this Sept. 28, 2017, photo, David Hanson, the founder of Hanson Robotics, talks with his company's flagship robot Sophia, a lifelike robot powered by artificial intelligence in Hong Kong. Sophia is a creation of the Hong Kong-based startup working on bringing humanoid robots to the marketplace. Hanson envisions a future in which AI-powered robots evolve to become "super-intelligent genius machines" that can help solve mankind's most challenging problems. (AP Photo/Kin Cheung)

In this Sept. 28, 2017, photo, David Hanson, the founder of Hanson Robotics, talks with his company's flagship robot Sophia, a lifelike robot powered by artificial intelligence in Hong Kong. Sophia is a creation of the Hong Kong-based startup working on bringing humanoid robots to the marketplace. Hanson envisions a future in which AI-powered robots evolve to become "super-intelligent genius machines" that can help solve mankind's most challenging problems. (AP Photo/Kin Cheung)

In this Sept. 28, 2017, photo, David Hanson, the founder of Hanson Robotics, talks with his company’s flagship robot Sophia, a lifelike robot powered by artificial intelligence in Hong Kong. Sophia is a creation of the Hong Kong-based startup working on bringing humanoid robots to the marketplace. Hanson envisions a future in which AI-powered robots evolve to become “super-intelligent genius machines” that can help solve mankind’s most challenging problems. (AP Photo/Kin Cheung)

Hanson, 49, is perhaps best known as the creator of Sophia, a talk show-going robot partly modeled on Audrey Hepburn that he calls his “masterpiece.”

Akin to an animated mannequin, she seems as much a product of his background in theatrics as an example of advanced technology.

“You’re talking to me right now, which is very ‘Blade Runner,’ no?” Sophia said during a recent visit to Hanson Robotics’ headquarters in a suburban Hong Kong science park, its home since shortly after Hanson relocated here in 2013.

“Do you ever look around you and think, ‘Wow I’m living in a real world science fiction novel?'” she asked. “Is it weird to be talking to a robot right now?”

Hanson Robotics has made about a dozen copies of Sophia, who like any human is a work in progress. A multinational team of scientists and engineers are fine tuning her appearance and the algorithms that enable her to smile, blink and refine her understanding and communication.

Sophia has moving 3D-printed arms and, with the help of a South Korean robotics company, she’s now going mobile. Shuffling slowly on boxy black legs, Sophia made her walking debut in Las Vegas last week at the CES electronics trade show.

Her skin is made of a nanotech material that Hanson invented and dubbed “Frubber,” short for flesh-rubber, that has a flesh-like bouncy texture. Cameras in her eyes and a 3D sensor in her chest help her to “see,” while the processor that serves as her brain combines facial and speech recognition, natural language processing, speech synthesis and a motion control system.

Sophia seems friendly and engaging, despite the unnatural pauses and cadence in her speech. Her predecessors include an Albert Einstein, complete with bushy mustache and white thatch of hair, a robot named Alice whose grimaces run a gamut of emotions and one eerily resembling the late sci-fi author Philip K. Dick, which won an award from the American Association of Artificial Intelligence. They variously leer, blink, smile and even crack jokes.

Disney’s venture capital arm is an investor in Hanson, which is building a robot based on one of the entertainment giant’s characters.

An artist and robotics scientist, Hanson worked on animatronic theme park shows, sculpting props and characters for Disney attractions like Pooh’s Hunny Hunt and Mermaid Lagoon. He studied film, animation and video, eventually earning a doctorate in interactive arts and technology from the University of Texas at Dallas.

Hanson says he makes his robots as human-like as possible to help alleviate fears about robots, artificial intelligence and automation.

That runs contrary to a tendency in the industry to use cute robo-pets or overtly machine-like robots like Star Wars’ R2-D2 to avoid the “uncanny valley” problem with human likenesses such as wax models and robots that many people find a bit creepy.

Some experts see Sophia as mainly a clever marketing gimmick.

“It’s a good advertising tool, whatever that company produces as a business plan,” said Roland Chin, chair professor of computer science at Hong Kong Baptist University.

Global market revenue for service robotics is forecast to grow from $3.7 billion in 2015 to $15 billion in 2020, according to IHS Markit. That includes both professional and domestic machines like warehouse automatons, smart vacuums and fuzzy companion robots.

Hanson Robotics is privately owned and has a consumer-oriented business that sells thousands of shoebox-sized $200 Professor Einstein educational robots a year. Chief Marketing Officer Jeanne Lim says the company is generating revenue but won’t say whether it’s profitable.

For now, artificial intelligence is best at doing specific tasks. It’s another thing entirely for machines to learn a new ability, generalize that knowledge and apply it in different contexts, partly because of the massive amount of computing power needed to process such information so quickly.

“We’re really very far from the kind of AI and robotics that you see in movies like ‘Blade Runner’,” said Pascale Fung, an engineering professor at Hong Kong University of Science and Technology. “Sorry to disappoint you.”

Unlike toddlers, who use all five senses to learn quickly, machines generally can handle only one type of input at a time, she noted.

While Sophia’s repartee can be entertaining, she’s easily thrown off topic and her replies, based on open-source software, sometimes miss the mark.

Hanson and other members of his team like Chief Scientist Ben Goertzel have set their sights on a time when the computer chips, processing capacity and other technologies needed for artificial general intelligence could enable Sophia and other robots to fill a variety of uses, such as helping with therapy for autistic children, caring for seniors, and providing customer services.

As for tackling challenging world problems, that’s a ways off, Hanson acknowledges.

“There’s a certain expression of genius to be able to get up and cross the room and pour yourself a cup of coffee, and robots and AI have not achieved that level of intelligence reliably,” Hanson said.

___

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In this Sept. 28, 2017, photo, David Hanson, the founder of Hanson Robotics, poses with his company's flagship robot Sophia, a lifelike robot powered by artificial intelligence in Hong Kong. Sophia is a creation of the Hong Kong-based startup working on bringing humanoid robots to the marketplace. Hanson envisions a future in which AI-powered robots evolve to become "super-intelligent genius machines" that can help solve mankind's most challenging problems. (AP Photo/Kin Cheung)

In this Sept. 28, 2017, photo, David Hanson, the founder of Hanson Robotics, poses with his company's flagship robot Sophia, a lifelike robot powered by artificial intelligence in Hong Kong. Sophia is a creation of the Hong Kong-based startup working on bringing humanoid robots to the marketplace. Hanson envisions a future in which AI-powered robots evolve to become "super-intelligent genius machines" that can help solve mankind's most challenging problems. (AP Photo/Kin Cheung)

In this Sept. 28, 2017, photo, David Hanson, the founder of Hanson Robotics, poses with his company’s flagship robot Sophia, a lifelike robot powered by artificial intelligence in Hong Kong. Sophia is a creation of the Hong Kong-based startup working on bringing humanoid robots to the marketplace. Hanson envisions a future in which AI-powered robots evolve to become “super-intelligent genius machines” that can help solve mankind’s most challenging problems. (AP Photo/Kin Cheung)

In this Sept. 28, 2017, photo, David Hanson, the founder of Hanson Robotics, works on his company's flagship robot Sophia, a lifelike robot powered by artificial intelligence in Hong Kong. Sophia is a creation of the Hong Kong-based startup working on bringing humanoid robots to the marketplace. Hanson envisions a future in which AI-powered robots evolve to become "super-intelligent genius machines" that can help solve mankind's most challenging problems. (AP Photo/Kin Cheung)

In this Sept. 28, 2017, photo, David Hanson, the founder of Hanson Robotics, works on his company's flagship robot Sophia, a lifelike robot powered by artificial intelligence in Hong Kong. Sophia is a creation of the Hong Kong-based startup working on bringing humanoid robots to the marketplace. Hanson envisions a future in which AI-powered robots evolve to become "super-intelligent genius machines" that can help solve mankind's most challenging problems. (AP Photo/Kin Cheung)

In this Sept. 28, 2017, photo, David Hanson, the founder of Hanson Robotics, works on his company’s flagship robot Sophia, a lifelike robot powered by artificial intelligence in Hong Kong. Sophia is a creation of the Hong Kong-based startup working on bringing humanoid robots to the marketplace. Hanson envisions a future in which AI-powered robots evolve to become “super-intelligent genius machines” that can help solve mankind’s most challenging problems. (AP Photo/Kin Cheung)

In this Sept. 28, 2017, photo, Hanson Robotics' flagship robot Sophia, a lifelike robot powered by artificial intelligence, speaks, in Hong Kong. Sophia is a creation of the Hong Kong-based startup working on bringing humanoid robots to the marketplace. Founder David Hanson envisions a future in which AI-powered robots evolve to become "super-intelligent genius machines" that can help solve mankind's most challenging problems. (AP Photo/Kin Cheung)

In this Sept. 28, 2017, photo, Hanson Robotics' flagship robot Sophia, a lifelike robot powered by artificial intelligence, speaks, in Hong Kong. Sophia is a creation of the Hong Kong-based startup working on bringing humanoid robots to the marketplace. Founder David Hanson envisions a future in which AI-powered robots evolve to become "super-intelligent genius machines" that can help solve mankind's most challenging problems. (AP Photo/Kin Cheung)

In this Sept. 28, 2017, photo, Hanson Robotics’ flagship robot Sophia, a lifelike robot powered by artificial intelligence, speaks, in Hong Kong. Sophia is a creation of the Hong Kong-based startup working on bringing humanoid robots to the marketplace. Founder David Hanson envisions a future in which AI-powered robots evolve to become “super-intelligent genius machines” that can help solve mankind’s most challenging problems. (AP Photo/Kin Cheung)

In this Sept. 28, 2017, photo, a robot head is covered by Hanson Robotics' skin, in Hong Kong. The skin is made of a nanotech material that founder David Hanson invented and dubbed "Frubber," short for flesh-rubber, that has a flesh-like bouncy texture. His Hong Kong-based startup is combining leading edge artificial intelligence with southern China's expertise in toy design, electronics and manufacturing to craft humanoid "social robots" with lifelike and appealing faces meant to bridge the "uncanny valley" and win trust from their human users. (AP Photo/Kin Cheung)

In this Sept. 28, 2017, photo, a robot head is covered by Hanson Robotics' skin, in Hong Kong. The skin is made of a nanotech material that founder David Hanson invented and dubbed "Frubber," short for flesh-rubber, that has a flesh-like bouncy texture. His Hong Kong-based startup is combining leading edge artificial intelligence with southern China's expertise in toy design, electronics and manufacturing to craft humanoid "social robots" with lifelike and appealing faces meant to bridge the "uncanny valley" and win trust from their human users. (AP Photo/Kin Cheung)

In this Sept. 28, 2017, photo, a robot head is covered by Hanson Robotics’ skin, in Hong Kong. The skin is made of a nanotech material that founder David Hanson invented and dubbed “Frubber,” short for flesh-rubber, that has a flesh-like bouncy texture. His Hong Kong-based startup is combining leading edge artificial intelligence with southern China’s expertise in toy design, electronics and manufacturing to craft humanoid “social robots” with lifelike and appealing faces meant to bridge the “uncanny valley” and win trust from their human users. (AP Photo/Kin Cheung)

In this Sept. 28, 2017 photo, a staff member of Hanson Robotics shows off a skin used for the company's flagship robot Sophia in Hong Kong.  Sophia is a creation of the Hong Kong-based startup working on bringing humanoid robots to the marketplace. The robot's skin is made of a nanotech material that founder David Hanson invented and dubbed "Frubber," short for flesh-rubber, that has a flesh-like bouncy texture.  (AP Photo/Kin Cheung)

In this Sept. 28, 2017 photo, a staff member of Hanson Robotics shows off a skin used for the company's flagship robot Sophia in Hong Kong.  Sophia is a creation of the Hong Kong-based startup working on bringing humanoid robots to the marketplace. The robot's skin is made of a nanotech material that founder David Hanson invented and dubbed "Frubber," short for flesh-rubber, that has a flesh-like bouncy texture.  (AP Photo/Kin Cheung)

In this Sept. 28, 2017 photo, a staff member of Hanson Robotics shows off a skin used for the company’s flagship robot Sophia in Hong Kong. Sophia is a creation of the Hong Kong-based startup working on bringing humanoid robots to the marketplace. The robot’s skin is made of a nanotech material that founder David Hanson invented and dubbed “Frubber,” short for flesh-rubber, that has a flesh-like bouncy texture. (AP Photo/Kin Cheung)

In this Sept. 28, 2017, photo, a staff member of Hanson Robotics checks a Professor Einstein educational robot in Hong Kong. The Hong Kong-based startup is privately owned and has a consumer-oriented business that sells thousands of shoebox-sized $200 Professor Einstein educational robots a year. (AP Photo/Kin Cheung)

In this Sept. 28, 2017, photo, a staff member of Hanson Robotics checks a Professor Einstein educational robot in Hong Kong. The Hong Kong-based startup is privately owned and has a consumer-oriented business that sells thousands of shoebox-sized $200 Professor Einstein educational robots a year. (AP Photo/Kin Cheung)

In this Sept. 28, 2017, photo, a staff member of Hanson Robotics checks a Professor Einstein educational robot in Hong Kong. The Hong Kong-based startup is privately owned and has a consumer-oriented business that sells thousands of shoebox-sized $200 Professor Einstein educational robots a year. (AP Photo/Kin Cheung)

This Sept. 28, 2017, photo shows Hanson Robotics' flagship robot Sophia, a lifelike robot powered by artificial intelligence, on display the company's office in Hong Kong. Sophia is a creation of the Hong Kong-based startup working on bringing humanoid robots to the marketplace. Founder David Hanson envisions a future in which AI-powered robots evolve to become "super-intelligent genius machines" that can help solve mankind's most challenging problems. (AP Photo/Kin Cheung)

This Sept. 28, 2017, photo shows Hanson Robotics' flagship robot Sophia, a lifelike robot powered by artificial intelligence, on display the company's office in Hong Kong. Sophia is a creation of the Hong Kong-based startup working on bringing humanoid robots to the marketplace. Founder David Hanson envisions a future in which AI-powered robots evolve to become "super-intelligent genius machines" that can help solve mankind's most challenging problems. (AP Photo/Kin Cheung)

This Sept. 28, 2017, photo shows Hanson Robotics’ flagship robot Sophia, a lifelike robot powered by artificial intelligence, on display the company’s office in Hong Kong. Sophia is a creation of the Hong Kong-based startup working on bringing humanoid robots to the marketplace. Founder David Hanson envisions a future in which AI-powered robots evolve to become “super-intelligent genius machines” that can help solve mankind’s most challenging problems. (AP Photo/Kin Cheung)

In this Sept. 28, 2017, photo, David Hanson, the founder of Hanson Robotics, poses with his company's flagship robot Sophia, a lifelike robot powered by artificial intelligence in Hong Kong. Sophia is a creation of the Hong Kong-based startup working on bringing humanoid robots to the marketplace. Hanson envisions a future in which AI-powered robots evolve to become "super-intelligent genius machines" that can help solve mankind's most challenging problems. (AP Photo/Kin Cheung)

In this Sept. 28, 2017, photo, David Hanson, the founder of Hanson Robotics, poses with his company's flagship robot Sophia, a lifelike robot powered by artificial intelligence in Hong Kong. Sophia is a creation of the Hong Kong-based startup working on bringing humanoid robots to the marketplace. Hanson envisions a future in which AI-powered robots evolve to become "super-intelligent genius machines" that can help solve mankind's most challenging problems. (AP Photo/Kin Cheung)

In this Sept. 28, 2017, photo, David Hanson, the founder of Hanson Robotics, poses with his company’s flagship robot Sophia, a lifelike robot powered by artificial intelligence in Hong Kong. Sophia is a creation of the Hong Kong-based startup working on bringing humanoid robots to the marketplace. Hanson envisions a future in which AI-powered robots evolve to become “super-intelligent genius machines” that can help solve mankind’s most challenging problems. (AP Photo/Kin Cheung)

In this Sept. 28, 2017, photo, David Hanson, the founder of Hanson Robotics, smiles with his company's flagship robot Sophia, a lifelike robot powered by artificial intelligence, for a photo in Hong Kong. Sophia is a creation of the Hong Kong-based startup working on bringing humanoid robots to the marketplace. Hanson envisions a future in which AI-powered robots evolve to become "super-intelligent genius machines" that can help solve mankind's most challenging problems. (AP Photo/Kin Cheung)

In this Sept. 28, 2017, photo, David Hanson, the founder of Hanson Robotics, smiles with his company's flagship robot Sophia, a lifelike robot powered by artificial intelligence, for a photo in Hong Kong. Sophia is a creation of the Hong Kong-based startup working on bringing humanoid robots to the marketplace. Hanson envisions a future in which AI-powered robots evolve to become "super-intelligent genius machines" that can help solve mankind's most challenging problems. (AP Photo/Kin Cheung)

In this Sept. 28, 2017, photo, David Hanson, the founder of Hanson Robotics, smiles with his company’s flagship robot Sophia, a lifelike robot powered by artificial intelligence, for a photo in Hong Kong. Sophia is a creation of the Hong Kong-based startup working on bringing humanoid robots to the marketplace. Hanson envisions a future in which AI-powered robots evolve to become “super-intelligent genius machines” that can help solve mankind’s most challenging problems. (AP Photo/Kin Cheung)

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Rangers’ new striker dreaming of playing in Old Firm derby

Jason Cummings has finalised his loan move to Rangers and then set his sights on fulfilling a lifelong ambition by playing in an Old Firm derby.

The Scotland international striker joined from Nottingham Forest initially until the end of the season, with the Ibrox side having an option to buy him at the end of the campaign.

The 22-year-old was a big-game specialist at Hibs, scoring eight goals against Rangers and was part of Alan Stubbs’ Easter Road side that famously beat Mark Warburton’s men 3-2 in the 2016 Scottish Cup final.

Jason Cummings has sealed a season-long loan move to Rangers from Nottingham Forest

Jason Cummings has sealed a season-long loan move to Rangers from Nottingham Forest

Jason Cummings has sealed a season-long loan move to Rangers from Nottingham Forest

The 22-year-old is raring to go for his new club and has set his sights on the Old Firm derby

The 22-year-old is raring to go for his new club and has set his sights on the Old Firm derby

The 22-year-old is raring to go for his new club and has set his sights on the Old Firm derby

Cummings’ form against the Glasgow giants once saw him proclaim that betting on him to find the net against Rangers was ‘like printing money’.

He was also prolific in Edinburgh derbies against Hearts, scoring five goals, and he is now hoping to take that kind of form into the Old Firm fixture with Rangers next facing Celtic on March 10 at Ibrox.

Cummings said: ‘I love playing in big games. The bigger the game it motivates me more and there’s a lot of big games in this league — especially the Old Firm.

‘Playing in an Old Firm game is something I’ve always wanted to do ever since I can remember. It’s the ultimate game to play in and I can’t wait.’

Cummings left Scottish football behind last summer when he joined Forest for £1million

Cummings left Scottish football behind last summer when he joined Forest for £1million

Cummings left Scottish football behind last summer when he joined Forest for £1million

Cummings was informed by new Forest boss Aitor Karanka he would face limited game time

Cummings was informed by new Forest boss Aitor Karanka he would face limited game time

Cummings was informed by new Forest boss Aitor Karanka he would face limited game time

Warburton paid Hibs £1million to take Cummings to Forest last summer but he has struggled to make an impact, scoring just once in the English Championship.

New Forest boss Aitor Karanka omitted him from his first squad for the 1-0 home loss to Aston Villa at the City Ground on Saturday.

Informed he would face limited game time in Nottingham, Cummings insisted the move to Rangers was a no-brainer.

‘I’m absolutely delighted to come to such a massive club. Once I knew Rangers were interested there was no question in my mind that I wanted to sign for them.

The former Hibernian striker, who has a proven track record on turning up for the big occasions, is already relishing featuring in the best games in Scotland's top division

The former Hibernian striker, who has a proven track record on turning up for the big occasions, is already relishing featuring in the best games in Scotland's top division

The former Hibernian striker, who has a proven track record on turning up for the big occasions, is already relishing featuring in the best games in Scotland’s top division

‘I was told I was not going to play as much down south so I wanted to get game time and get back to enjoying my football. I can’t wait to get started.’

With Kenny Miller injured and Eduardo Herrera facing an uncertain future, Cummings’ addition provides Rangers with a valuable option alongside the Scottish Premiership’s leading scorer, Alfredo Morelos.

The Ibrox club, who have already sealed temporary deals for QPR midfielder Sean Goss and Brighton forward Jamie Murphy, are also close to finalising a loan move for Scotland and Norwich centre-half Russell Martin.

The striker admitted ambitions to play for Scotland again after making his debut in November

The striker admitted ambitions to play for Scotland again after making his debut in November

The striker admitted ambitions to play for Scotland again after making his debut in November

Cummings believes he can strike up a good understanding with the young Colombian and hopes he can add to the one Scotland cap he won against Holland at Pittodrie in November.

‘Hopefully I can play up front with (Morelos),’ he said. ‘He looks the type of player I would like to play with. He likes a goal himself, he’s strong, he’s young and I could see us linking up well.

‘Obviously, as a team we want to push Celtic as much as we can. And personally I want to get myself back into the Scotland squad. Hopefully I can do that and I want to score as many goals as I can.

‘Everyone knows what I’ve got to offer. They know I score goals, work hard for the boys and every time I go out there at Ibrox I will give 110 per cent.’

He is also confident of striking up a deadly partnership with leading scorer Alfredo Morelos

He is also confident of striking up a deadly partnership with leading scorer Alfredo Morelos

He is also confident of striking up a deadly partnership with leading scorer Alfredo Morelos

Poland – Factors to Watch Jan 16

Reuters

Following are news stories, media reports and events to watch that may affect Poland’s financial markets on Tuesday. ALL TIMES GMT (Poland: GMT + 1 hour):

DATA

Poland’s central bank will release December net inflation data at 1300 GMT.

GOVERNMENT MEETING

Poland’s government holds its weekly meeting at 0900 GMT to discuss the main assumptions of 2018 foreign policy.

DEFENCE

The current price for the Patriot missile defence system being offered by Raytheon Co to Poland is around $7 billion compared to $10.5 billion estimated earlier, the Dziennik Gazeta Prawna daily reported, quoting unnamed sources.

The paper said the Patriot deal between Poland and the United States may be signed in the first or second quarter of this year.

PLAY

Mobile operator Play has acquired an option to buy Virgin Mobile Polska in 2020, Play said in a statement on Monday evening.

KGHM

Copper production at state-run KGHM missed last year’s target by more than 22,000 tonnes, the Dziennik Gazeta Prawna daily reported quoting the company.

COAL

Thirty units generating heat and power in Poland had problems with keeping required coal inventories last year due to shortages on the market, the Dziennik Gazeta Prawna daily reported citing data by energy market regulator URE.

SMOG

Poland’s attempts to improve air quality, which include removing the worst-quality coal from the market, have resulted in a rise in coal retail prices, the Rzeczpospolita daily said.

The paper also reported that Poland’s coal imports between January and November were up 60 percent year on year.

RATES, DEBT

If the Monetary Policy Council keeps interest rates unchanged this year Poland’s cost of debt servicing may be several hundred million zlotys lower than planned, the Dziennik Gazeta Prawna daily said quoting the finance ministry.

ENERGY

Poland’s energy sector will suffer most from higher water costs which result from a new law which came into effect on January 1, the Parkiet daily said.

**** Reuters has not verified stories reported by the Polish media and does not vouch for their accuracy. ****

For other related news, double click on: Polish equities E.Europe equities Polish money Polish debt Eastern Europe All emerging markets Hot stocks Stock markets Market debt news Forex news For real-time index quotes, double click on: Warsaw WIG20 Budapest BUX Prague PX (Reporting by Warsaw Bureau)

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Explosion destroys three Belgian buildings, injuring 14

Reuters

BRUSSELS, Jan 15 (Reuters) – An explosion injured 14 people and destroyed three residential buildings in the Belgian city of Antwerp on Monday evening, police said, stressing the incident was not the result of an attack.

Antwerp police said in the early hours of Tuesday that five people had been seriously injured and another was in a critical state after the explosion in a part of the city where many students live.

Rescue workers were still searching the rubble for further victims, the fire brigade said. A man, a woman and a child were freed after about two hours under the debris. Police said two people were missing.

Police said it was too early to be certain of the cause of the explosion. Belgian media said it was likely to have been an explosion of gas.

Belgium has been on high alert since deadly suicide bombings in 2016 and a wave of Islamist attacks across Europe. (Reporting by Gabriela Baczynska and Philip Blenkinsop; editing by Andrew Roche and Robert-Jan Bartunek)

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UKIP chief ‘tried to cover up model mistress’s rants’

Ukip leader Henry Bolton (pictured on Monday) said he had split with glamour model Jo Marney

Ukip leader Henry Bolton (pictured on Monday) said he had split with glamour model Jo Marney

Ukip leader Henry Bolton (pictured on Monday) said he had split with glamour model Jo Marney

Ukip leader Henry Bolton allegedly tried to cover up his mistress’s rants by sending menacing and threatening text messages to her ex-boyfriend.

The 54-year-old yesterday confirmed he had split up with glamour model Jo Marney after it emerged she had joked online about the sexual abuse of babies.

Ms Marney, 25, also sent racist texts about Prince Harry‘s fiancee and US actress Meghan Markle.

But a series of text messages appear to show Mr Bolton threatening her former boyfriend and warning him to stop leaking her messages.

According to The Sun, he told the man – known as ‘Patrick’ – that he was ‘playing with fire’.

He is said to have written: ‘Patrick, you are so far out of your depth here. You are playing with fire. Do that immediately and then, really, pack it in.’

Her ex-boyfriend replied: ‘Yeah completely understand. But if Ben did not tell you. How on earth?

‘I’m confused. I’m telling him no but how can you possibly know the full details of a private conversation without violating his Twitter account to view them?’

The Ukip leader said: ‘It’s a shame you let Ben talk you into releasing the other messages you received from Jo. Why did you do that?’

And the boyfriend later added that he will tell him if he promises not to make his life ‘agony’ and added that he ‘scares’ him.

Mr Bolton is said to have replied: ‘If you tell me yes, but more so if you promise not to do this. Then I will leave you alone.’

He threatened legal action and mentioned getting he could take him to court in the text messages.

Former Ukip leadership rival Ben Walker told the paper: ‘Threatening anybody to withhold the truth with no legal basis is bad enough but, to do it as an ex-policeman and now political party leader is unforgivable’.

Meanwhile, a Ukip spokesman said: ‘Yes, Henry did talk to this man to say ‘wind your neck in’.

‘But it was not about the racist messages. The man is being encouraged to reveal any messages that were damaging. These ones refereed to baby rape.’

He said he was split with Ms Marney

He said he was split with Ms Marney

The pair (pictured at Christmas 2017) are no longer together

The pair (pictured at Christmas 2017) are no longer together

But a series of text messages appear to show Mr Bolton threatening her former boyfriend and warning him to stop leaking the messages from Ms Marney (pictured together) 

Mr Bolton described his relationship with Ms Marney as 'pure coincidence' and insisted that he did not leave his wife to pursue the model

Mr Bolton described his relationship with Ms Marney as 'pure coincidence' and insisted that he did not leave his wife to pursue the model

Mr Bolton described his relationship with Ms Marney as ‘pure coincidence’ and insisted that he did not leave his wife to pursue the model

It comes after Mr Bolton’s estranged wife Tatiana Smurova hit out at her husband’s hypocrisy yesterday, saying he only left her to save his political career and not because of the ‘hurt and devastation’ he has caused his family.

The 42-year-old said Bolton had been in a ‘damaging relationship’ that had left her concerned for the safety of her two young children.

She told MailOnline: ‘ I must say I was quite relieved because I was extremely worried for my children being in contact with their father in the future whilst he is in that damaging relationship.

‘As for a possible reconciliation, I think there is little basis to speak about it at the moment. My husband left us, his family with two little ones.

‘Not only was he unloyal, he was also dishonest about how it all happened. I am still deeply hurt and believe a sincere apology should have come from him.’ 

In a stream of vile messages, glamour model Ms Marney also says that she would never have sex with ‘a negro’ because they are ‘ugly’

In a stream of vile messages, glamour model Ms Marney also says that she would never have sex with ‘a negro’ because they are ‘ugly’

Jo Marney has been suspended by Ukip after messages emerged where she had made racist comments about Meghan Markle

Jo Marney has been suspended by Ukip after messages emerged where she had made racist comments about Meghan Markle

In a stream of vile messages, glamour model Ms Marney (pictured in modelling images) had said that she would never have sex with ‘a negro’ because they are ‘ugly’

Johanna Konta beats Madison Brengle in straight sets

  • Johanna Konta beat Madison Brengle 6-3, 6-1 in the Australian Open first round 
  • Konta claimed the first 6-3 after coming out aggressively at the Hisense Arena 
  • The American was ranked No 90 in the world ahead of her match against Konta
  • Konta now faces 23 year-old world No 123 Bernarda Pera in the second round

Mike Dickson In Melbourne

Jo Konta has often reserved her best for the Australian Open, and she got her 2018 campaign off to a flying start on Tuesday with a comfortable victory over American Madison Brengle.

The British number one eased through her first round with a 6-3, 6-1 victory that took 66 minutes against the world No 90.

In the last two editions Konta has made the semi-finals and quarter finals, only stopped last year by Serena Williams. Once again the relatively pacey hard courts of Melbourne Park seemed to be to her liking. 

Johanna Konta produced a dominant display to beat Madison Brengle in straight sets

Konta embraces Brengle after comfortable straight-sets victory in Melbourne on Tuesday

Konta embraces Brengle after comfortable straight-sets victory in Melbourne on Tuesday

Konta embraces Brengle after comfortable straight-sets victory in Melbourne on Tuesday

She now has what looks like another very winnable match in the second round, against another US player, 23 year-old world No 123 Bernarda Pera, who only got into the draw as a lucky loser. It was a lovely morning in Victoria, although temperatures could get stiflingly hot later in the week.

Konta was in confident form from the beginning against the player who has the last registered win against Williams, achieved in last year’s Australian Open warm-up tournament in New Zealand.

Brengle can be an awkward opponent with a variety of spins and slices, but her serve is vulnerable and Konta duly tucked in, breaking five times in all.

Konta came out aggressively during the opening stages of the match at the Hisense Arena

Konta came out aggressively during the opening stages of the match at the Hisense Arena

Konta came out aggressively during the opening stages of the match at the Hisense Arena

Brengle couldn't prevent Konta from breaking as she struggled to match her opponent

Brengle couldn't prevent Konta from breaking as she struggled to match her opponent

Brengle couldn’t prevent Konta from breaking as she struggled to match her opponent

The Brit dominated Brengle with a series of powerful forehands to take the first set 6-3

The Brit dominated Brengle with a series of powerful forehands to take the first set 6-3

The Brit dominated Brengle with a series of powerful forehands to take the first set 6-3

Her own serve was in sound working order, achieving a 71 % success rate on landing in her first delivery.

‘I’m very happy with that match, she gets a lot of balls back and makes her opponent work for it,’ said Konta. ‘ I love playing here and had some of the best results of my career here. I’m excited to be back here on Thursday.’

Her dominance was shown in her making 37 winners compared to her opponent’s meagre total of four. The only blemish came when she was broken back for 5-3 in the first set, and she needed to save break points when closing it out.

Konta has already shown flashes of her best tennis on this trip, most notably in Brisbane against Madison Keys and Elina Svitolina, and if she gets on a roll she will be dangerous. 

Konta remained aggressive on second serve and looked confident with her service game

Konta remained aggressive on second serve and looked confident with her service game

Konta remained aggressive on second serve and looked confident with her service game

World No 90 Brengle over-hit a number of shots during the first set against Konta in Melbourne

World No 90 Brengle over-hit a number of shots during the first set against Konta in Melbourne

World No 90 Brengle over-hit a number of shots during the first set against Konta in Melbourne

Konta is good friends with Brengle from their days coming up in the lower reaches of the circuit, to the point where they lend books to each other to read. However, it was obvious there would be no quarter given on the court.

‘She brings different sorts of difficulties,’ said Konta. ‘I thought it was a great first round for me to fight through and stay strong in the way I wanted to play out there.

‘She gets a lot of balls back. As you saw in some of those points, I think that’s definitely her comfort zone. I wanted to make sure I was playing most of the match in my comfort zone.’ 

Konta delivered a brilliant backhand to earn three set points before taking the first 6-3

Konta delivered a brilliant backhand to earn three set points before taking the first 6-3

Konta delivered a brilliant backhand to earn three set points before taking the first 6-3

Spectators watch the first-round match at the Hisense Arena in the sweltering Melbourne heat

Spectators watch the first-round match at the Hisense Arena in the sweltering Melbourne heat

Spectators watch the first-round match at the Hisense Arena in the sweltering Melbourne heat

Trump holds umbrella over self as he boards Air Force One

President Donald Trump along with wife Melania and son Barron boarded Air Force One amid rainy Florida weather on Martin Luther King Jr day.

Photos show President 45 holding a large black umbrella close to his head – perhaps in an effort to keep his famous hair from being pelted by rain drops.

But wife Melania, 47, and Barron, 11, are left to the mercy of the elements as they board the plane at Palm Beach International Airport in West Palm Beach.

It is not clear whether Trump, 71, at any point offered space under his large umbrella to his wife or son.

Scroll down for video 

Donald Trump shields himself with a large black umbrella as he boards Air Force One at Palm Beach International Airport following a long holiday weekend in Mar-a-Lago

Donald Trump shields himself with a large black umbrella as he boards Air Force One at Palm Beach International Airport following a long holiday weekend in Mar-a-Lago

Donald Trump shields himself with a large black umbrella as he boards Air Force One at Palm Beach International Airport following a long holiday weekend in Mar-a-Lago

It appears that he left his 11-year-old son, Barron, who is clad in a buttoned-up polo shirt tucked into a pair of blue jeans, to the elements

It appears that he left his 11-year-old son, Barron, who is clad in a buttoned-up polo shirt tucked into a pair of blue jeans, to the elements

It appears that he left his 11-year-old son, Barron, who is clad in a buttoned-up polo shirt tucked into a pair of blue jeans, to the elements

Also not pictured under the umbrella was wife Melania, 47. Trump kept the umbrella close to his head in an effort to ensure he would be virtually untouched by water

Also not pictured under the umbrella was wife Melania, 47. Trump kept the umbrella close to his head in an effort to ensure he would be virtually untouched by water

Also not pictured under the umbrella was wife Melania, 47. Trump kept the umbrella close to his head in an effort to ensure he would be virtually untouched by water

Haitian community members protested Trump near his Mar-a-Lago estate on Monday, Martin Luther King Jr day. One protester held up a sign likening Trump to dictators Benito Mussolini, Adolf Hitler and Joseph Stalin

Haitian community members protested Trump near his Mar-a-Lago estate on Monday, Martin Luther King Jr day. One protester held up a sign likening Trump to dictators Benito Mussolini, Adolf Hitler and Joseph Stalin

Haitian community members protested Trump near his Mar-a-Lago estate on Monday, Martin Luther King Jr day. One protester held up a sign likening Trump to dictators Benito Mussolini, Adolf Hitler and Joseph Stalin

One photo even shows the ever-careful Trump closing his umbrella from inside the plane – ensuring that at no point he would be struck by the wet pellets. 

The First Family is traveling back to Washington D.C. after a long holiday weekend spent at Mar-a-Lago. 

Meanwhile, protesters lined up near the resort to protest against Trump. The most recent reason for protest is Trump’s disparaging comments about Haiti and African nations.

The Trump administration has both denied his comments and has claimed that they were misrepresented. Multiple politicians present at the meeting have said he made the comments.

In a closed-door meeting about immigration, he allegedly said: ‘Why are we having all these people from s***hole countries come here?’

One protester held up a sign showing Trump side-by-side with dictators Benito Mussolini, Adolf Hitler and Joseph Stalin.

Trump has come under fire after alleged comments he made at a closed-door meeting about immigration came to light. Attendees at the meeting say he said: 'Why are we having all these people from s***hole countries come here?'

Trump has come under fire after alleged comments he made at a closed-door meeting about immigration came to light. Attendees at the meeting say he said: 'Why are we having all these people from s***hole countries come here?'

Trump has come under fire after alleged comments he made at a closed-door meeting about immigration came to light. Attendees at the meeting say he said: ‘Why are we having all these people from s***hole countries come here?’

Photos appear to show Barron waiting for his mother, Melania, to pass him on the stairs up to Air Force One so that she may board the plane first

Photos appear to show Barron waiting for his mother, Melania, to pass him on the stairs up to Air Force One so that she may board the plane first

Photos appear to show Barron waiting for his mother, Melania, to pass him on the stairs up to Air Force One so that she may board the plane first

Barron is left to wait in the rain as his parents board the plane. It is not clear whether an umbrella was ever offered to him

Barron is left to wait in the rain as his parents board the plane. It is not clear whether an umbrella was ever offered to him

Barron is left to wait in the rain as his parents board the plane. It is not clear whether an umbrella was ever offered to him

The Trump administration released a video of Trump praising Martin Luther King Jr on Monday

The Trump administration released a video of Trump praising Martin Luther King Jr on Monday

The Trump administration released a video of Trump praising Martin Luther King Jr on Monday

'Dr King’s dream is our dream. It is the American dream. It’s the promise stitched into the fabric of our nation, etched into the hearts of our people, and written into the soul of human kind,' Trump said

'Dr King’s dream is our dream. It is the American dream. It’s the promise stitched into the fabric of our nation, etched into the hearts of our people, and written into the soul of human kind,' Trump said

‘Dr King’s dream is our dream. It is the American dream. It’s the promise stitched into the fabric of our nation, etched into the hearts of our people, and written into the soul of human kind,’ Trump said

Another held a sign that read: ‘Stop your racism Trump! Haitians contributed to the freedom of the US.’

One little known fact about The American Revolution, also known as the War for American Independence, is that Haitian soldiers contributed to the U.S. colonists’ struggle against Britain.

Multiple Haitian-Americans and Haitians came to West Palm Beach to protest in an effort to demand an apology from Trump for his comments. 

On Monday, Trump tweeted out a videotaped statement hailing Dr Martin Luther King Jr’s dream of racial harmony, just hours after declaring himself ‘not a racist’ in response to his reported comments.

‘Dr King’s dream is our dream. It is the American dream. It’s the promise stitched into the fabric of our nation, etched into the hearts of our people, and written into the soul of human kind,’ Trump said in the statement.

His pre-recorded statements were interspersed with clips from the historic 1963 March on Washington and King’s ‘I Have a Dream’ speech. 

‘It is the dream of a world where people are judged by who they are, not how they look or where they come from,’ Trump said in a plain-spoken paraphrase of King’s lofty rhetoric. 

Haitian community members protest Trump near his Mar-a-Lago estate. Pictured in the background are counter-protesters. One sign reads 'Sorry Hilary (sic) We Were Brainwashed'

Haitian community members protest Trump near his Mar-a-Lago estate. Pictured in the background are counter-protesters. One sign reads 'Sorry Hilary (sic) We Were Brainwashed'

Haitian community members protest Trump near his Mar-a-Lago estate. Pictured in the background are counter-protesters. One sign reads ‘Sorry Hilary (sic) We Were Brainwashed’

A woman holds up a sign that reads: 'Stop your racism Trump! Haitians contributed to the freedom of the US'

A woman holds up a sign that reads: 'Stop your racism Trump! Haitians contributed to the freedom of the US'

A woman holds up a sign that reads: ‘Stop your racism Trump! Haitians contributed to the freedom of the US’

Protesters told the Associated Press that they were demonstrating near Mar-a-Lago in an effort to demand an apology from Trump

Protesters told the Associated Press that they were demonstrating near Mar-a-Lago in an effort to demand an apology from Trump

Protesters told the Associated Press that they were demonstrating near Mar-a-Lago in an effort to demand an apology from Trump

Pictured are two supporters of Donald Trump. The one at left is confronting the one at right, who was speaking on a bullhorn, over alleged disrespect and hate

Pictured are two supporters of Donald Trump. The one at left is confronting the one at right, who was speaking on a bullhorn, over alleged disrespect and hate

Pictured are two supporters of Donald Trump. The one at left is confronting the one at right, who was speaking on a bullhorn, over alleged disrespect and hate

West Palm Beach police put up yellow tape to keep protesters on the sidewalk near Mar-a-Lago

West Palm Beach police put up yellow tape to keep protesters on the sidewalk near Mar-a-Lago

West Palm Beach police put up yellow tape to keep protesters on the sidewalk near Mar-a-Lago

Protesters dressed as characters from the Handmaid's Tale stand next to ones holding up a sign spelling the word 'loser' as Trump's motorcade passes by while en route to the airport

Protesters dressed as characters from the Handmaid's Tale stand next to ones holding up a sign spelling the word 'loser' as Trump's motorcade passes by while en route to the airport

Protesters dressed as characters from the Handmaid’s Tale stand next to ones holding up a sign spelling the word ‘loser’ as Trump’s motorcade passes by while en route to the airport

Trump said King’s words ‘have inspired Americans of all backgrounds since they were spoken on that historic day.’

‘Dr. King’s dream is our dream. It is the American dream. It’s the promise stitched into the fabric of our nation, etched into the hearts of our people, and written into the soul of human kind,’ he said.

‘It is the dream of a world where people are judged by who they are, not how they look or where they come from,’ said Trump.

‘It is the dream of a nation that offers life and dignity and hope to every American, regardless of color or creed,’ Trump said.

Just hours earlier, Trump defended the content of his own character, when he told reporters at Mar-a-Lago: ‘No, no, I’m not a racist.’

He added: ‘I am the least racist person you have ever interviewed, that I can tell you.’

Trump closes his umbrella from inside Air Force One as he, Melania and Barron return to Washington D.C.

Trump closes his umbrella from inside Air Force One as he, Melania and Barron return to Washington D.C.

Trump closes his umbrella from inside Air Force One as he, Melania and Barron return to Washington D.C.

Trump was asked the question after the Washington Post reported he railed against immigration from ‘s***hole countries’, something the president and his allies later denied. 

Trump’s statements about universal dignity came after continued fallout from the Oval Office meeting Thursday, where he reportedly lashed out at immigration from countries such as Haiti and El Salvador.

While there is a dispute over the language he used, the White House has not denied the substance of the president’s position: that he favored immigration from countries like Norway and from Asia, but not from the other countries.

Trump began the Monday holiday with a trip to his Trump International Golf Club just after 9am.