Counties push for higher levels of compensation over loss of top cricketers to the IPL 

The return of England’s A list cricketers from Indian Premier League duty on Thursday coincides with fed-up counties campaigning for higher levels of compensation for their participation.

Following last month’s off-diary gathering of directors of cricket chaired by Yorkshire’s Martyn Moxon in Birmingham a proposal has been put forward whereby clubs hit by the loss of players to the IPL in future will pocket a share of the ECB’s compensation in addition to their existing remuneration.

Historically, the ECB have received a payment of 10 per cent of an individual’s salary from their Indian counterparts but this year it doubled to 20 per cent. 

Counties are pushing for more compensation for the loss of players to the IPL

Counties are pushing for more compensation for the loss of players to the IPL

Counties are pushing for more compensation for the loss of players to the IPL

However, at their next meeting with the ECB on June 7, county chief executives will push for this to be split to offset further the loss of the country’s premier performers during an increasingly rare window for them to play here domestically.

Sportsmail can reveal that under the new proposals, a county would claim the entire sum in the event of losing an individual outside the centralised contracts system.

The 20 per cent payment for those on white-ball ECB contracts would be split 75-25 in favour of the county club while the share for those on full central contracts like Ben Stokes would be 50-50.

If the formula was applied to the 2018 auction, cash-strapped Durham would have been boosted to the tune of £137,000 when Stokes joined Rajasthan Royals for a whopping £1.37million.

Lancashire would have received £73,500 for the absence of white-ball specialist Jos Buttler, who is returning from the subcontinent ahead of schedule following his recall to the England Test squad.

And at the lower end of the scale, Sussex and Surrey would have received an extra £22,500 apiece for the losses of Chris Jordan and Tom Curran respectively from early-season County Championship action.

 If formula  was applied before 2018 IPL, Lancashire would have got £73,500 for Jos Buttler

 If formula  was applied before 2018 IPL, Lancashire would have got £73,500 for Jos Buttler

 If formula was applied before 2018 IPL, Lancashire would have got £73,500 for Jos Buttler

The ECB has not previously passed on these payments, arguing that they are reinvested in the game evenly and that the counties already receive a rebate on the players’ salary as compensation for them being unavailable.

County players granted no objection certificates to travel to the IPL must reimburse their primary employers at a rate of one per cent of their annual salary per day for the first 21 days and at a rate of 0.7 per cent for subsequent days away.

However, this formula is only applied to the IPL, not the other Twenty20 tournaments around the world — something the counties would also like to change amid widespread alterations.

They are keen on a decrease in the level of payback to replicate the pro-rata system used by the ECB for their centrally-contracted players — a day’s annual salary forfeited for every day of absence.

But this, they contend, should be extended to other global T20 competitions too, such as Australia’s Big Bash, Pakistan Super League and Bangladesh Premier League.

One of the main beefs aired at the directors of cricket meeting was that while the counties remain the primary employers for the majority of English cricketers, they are effectively leasing them to foreign leagues free of charge. Yet the franchises that borrow them have no liability should the hired hands get injured.

The ECB agreed to review the direct IPL payments of the past few years ahead of the meeting in three weeks’ time at which the introduction of a signing cut-off date for future IPLs will be discussed. 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *