Claims BBC’s new website predicts cloud and rain every day

The BBC has revealed its updated weather website and app, promising users a slicker experience when they try to predict if they need an umbrella or not.

However, users have been left disappointed with the new technology – with some describing it as ‘incomprehensible gibberish’, and blasting the new graphics as too complicated.

One app user claimed that the update is always predicting a chance of rain in order to cover itself.

'Faff over clarity': Anne-Louise Quinton said the app constantly predicts a chance of rain in order to cover itself

'Faff over clarity': Anne-Louise Quinton said the app constantly predicts a chance of rain in order to cover itself

‘Faff over clarity’: Anne-Louise Quinton said the app constantly predicts a chance of rain in order to cover itself

Speaking on his blog, Michael Burnett, Executive Product Manager at the BBC, said: 'People sometimes say, “If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it” so I want to emphasise this is not change for change’s sake' (pictured: The new app)

Speaking on his blog, Michael Burnett, Executive Product Manager at the BBC, said: 'People sometimes say, “If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it” so I want to emphasise this is not change for change’s sake' (pictured: The new app)

The app was hailed to be a vast improvement on the last

The app was hailed to be a vast improvement on the last

Speaking on his blog, Michael Burnett, Executive Product Manager at the BBC, said: ‘People sometimes say, “If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it” so I want to emphasise this is not change for change’s sake’ (pictured: The new app)

The app was hailed to be a vast improvement on the last, providing users with 14 days of weather information ahead of time, tech-savvy graphics and new features such as ‘chance of rain’. This is alongside an increased number of locations and interactive maps.

However, users of the technology have not been impressed so far – with a Twitter user pointing out her two very different forecasts on the same day at the same location, just on different phones.

Another said she wished the BBC had left the app alone: ‘Just updated my BBC weather app. Sooo confusing compared to original version. Leave it alone! I left Met Office app for the same reason.’ 

If ain't broke: Another Twitter user said she would be switching to the Met Office app

If ain't broke: Another Twitter user said she would be switching to the Met Office app

If ain’t broke: Another Twitter user said she would be switching to the Met Office app

Speaking on his blog, Michael Burnett, Executive Product Manager at the BBC, said: ‘People sometimes say, “If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it” so I want to emphasise this is not change for change’s sake. 

‘We carried out extensive user testing and prototyping to find out what worked and what didn’t so we could pinpoint improvements in design and user experience.’ 

Comments in response to his blog post were less than flattering. One user said: ‘As usual change for the sake of change. The previous graphics are fine. No connection to the actual news forecast. Very unhelpful and pointless’.

Another said: ‘With limited resources I wonder how the BBC can justify spending time and money changing a site that did the job.’ 

A disgruntled user added that they would be changing their weather app preference: ‘Sorry Beeb, this is horrible. You may well have needed to overhaul the backend, but no need to have thrown away the front end.

‘True, people get used to anything eventually, but that doesn’t mean it’s better. Have started using the Met Office App – much better.’

The BBC have been contacted for comment. 

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