Joe Schmidt wary of inexperienced Ireland being ‘spooked’

  • Joe Schmidt named Andrew Porter, James Ryan and Chris Farrell in team  
  • Inexperience is concern against Wales who boast plenty of experience  
  • Ireland boss said: ‘You can get spooked, you can get put off balance’

Liam Heagney For The Irish Daily Mail

Joe Schmidt is praying his inexperienced Ireland side don’t get spooked by the pressure in Saturday’s Six Nations showdown with Wales.

Having lost three of his Lions contingent – Tadhg Furlong, Iain Henderson and Robbie Henshaw – through injury from the round-two win over Italy, the Irish coach has selected a half-dozen players who have six caps or less in his much-changed side.

They include rookies Andrew Porter (one), James Ryan (two) and Chris Farrell (two) who only have five Test starts between them, a figure in sharp contrast to what the recalled Welsh trio of Lions Leigh Halfpenny (73), Liam Williams (40) and Dan Biggar (52) are bringing to the Lansdowne Road party – a collective 165 Test starts.

Joe Schmidt is wary of his inexperienced players being spooked by the huge game

Joe Schmidt is wary of his inexperienced players being spooked by the huge game

Joe Schmidt is wary of his inexperienced players being spooked by the huge game

Andrew Porter is among the players without top level international experience for Ireland

Andrew Porter is among the players without top level international experience for Ireland

Andrew Porter is among the players without top level international experience for Ireland

Schmidt has targeted a good start as essential as he looks to beat old foes Wales for only the second time in five championship attempts and for the first time since 2014.

‘Sometimes when you’re selecting you want to have some experience around inexperienced players,’ he said. 

‘When things are happening as fast as they do in a Test match, you can get spooked, you can get put off balance and you can get uncomfortable. We want to keep that assurance that some of these young guys are going to stay in the game. 

‘They are going to have the confidence alongside them. Rory Best is going to grab Andrew Porter at the first scrum and make sure Andrew is ready to go.

Schmidt is looking for senior players to help youngsters like James Ryan (right)

Schmidt is looking for senior players to help youngsters like James Ryan (right)

Schmidt is looking for senior players to help youngsters like James Ryan (right)

‘Devin [Toner] is going to get an arm around James Ryan and make sure he is ready to go. And between Bundee [Aki] and Keith Earls, hopefully Chris is [ready too].

‘It’s a balance but you have got to have confidence in those inexperienced players stepping up and keeping their confidence.

‘You try to get into the game early, get an early touch,’ continued the Ireland coach about his plan to help his rookies settle. ‘That is part of having players around them who have been there before.

‘They know there is going to be tough periods in the game and they know there is going to be some opportunities created and when you get those opportunities you have got to put them away.’ 

Schmidt has made five changes from the win over Italy. Cian Healy and CJ Stander retake their places from Jack McGrath and Jack Conan, who both drop to a bench. John Ryan and Fergus McFadden, omitted against Italy, have been recalled as cover.

The Ireland boss recognises that the level of difficulty in the Six Nations is about to ratchet up

The Ireland boss recognises that the level of difficulty in the Six Nations is about to ratchet up

The Ireland boss recognises that the level of difficulty in the Six Nations is about to ratchet up

Bolton sign ex-Bayern Munich midfielder on short-term deal

  • Jan Kirchoff has signed a short-term deal until the end of the season with Bolton
  • Kirchoff said: ‘I’m really pleased to be here and happy to be back in football’ 
  • The 27-year-old was a free agent after his release from Sunderland last season 

Simon Jones And Jordan Seward For Mailonline

Jan Kirchoff has signed a short term deal with Championship side Bolton Wanderers after impressing on trial. 

The 27-year old former Bayern Munich midfielder was a free agent following his release from Sunderland last summer. 

He signed for the Black Cats in 2016 from Bayern and made 23 appearances before leaving by mutual consent after their relegation from the Premier League

Bolton have completed the free signing of Jan Kirchoff on a deal until the end of the season

Bolton have completed the free signing of Jan Kirchoff on a deal until the end of the season

Bolton have completed the free signing of Jan Kirchoff on a deal until the end of the season

Kirchoff had been without a club since the end of last season but has now penned a deal at the Macron Stadium until the end of the season.

‘I’m really pleased to be here and happy to be back in football,’ he told Bolton’s official website.

‘I’m looking forward to the rest of the season and to play for this great team.’

The 27-year-old has not had a club since last season following his release from Sunderland 

The 27-year-old has not had a club since last season following his release from Sunderland 

The 27-year-old has not had a club since last season following his release from Sunderland 

Bolton boss Phil Parkinson also admitted he was delighted by the acquisition of an experienced player such as Kirchoff as they continue their battle to avoid the drop to Sky Bet League One.

‘Jan is a player of excellent pedigree and will be an excellent addition to the squad as we head towards the final months of the campaign,’ said Parkinson. 

The German, who can also operate as a defender, could make his Bolton debut in Saturday’s trip to Norwich. 

Bolton manager Phil Parkinson said: 'Jan  will be an excellent addition to the squad'

Bolton manager Phil Parkinson said: 'Jan  will be an excellent addition to the squad'

Bolton manager Phil Parkinson said: ‘Jan will be an excellent addition to the squad’

Chipotle adds quinoa to the menu

Chipotle has introduced quinoa at its test kitchen in New York City, drawing a range of reactions on social media.

The restaurant chain is jumping on the superfood bandwagon that’s been promoted heavily by nutritionists in the past five years as a higher protein, lower calorie substitute for rice.

The brand claims that quinoa will give customers an option to add ‘an extra nutritional kick’ to their bowl, burrito or salad.

However, registered dietitian Liz Weinandy said that while the grain is a better source of protein, fiber and carbohydrates than rice, the swap it will only shave off around 100 calories from your meal.

Chipotle has introduced trendy superfood quinoa at its test kitchen in New York City, claiming that is can add 'an extra nutritional kick' to a customer's order

Chipotle has introduced trendy superfood quinoa at its test kitchen in New York City, claiming that is can add 'an extra nutritional kick' to a customer's order

Chipotle has introduced trendy superfood quinoa at its test kitchen in New York City, claiming that is can add ‘an extra nutritional kick’ to a customer’s order

‘Quinoa has a better carbohydrate profile because its lower in carbs so it doesn’t affect your blood sugar as much as rice does,’ Weinandy said. 

Replacing the standard half-cup serving of the restaurant’s cilantro lime rice with quinoa won’t make a huge difference for occasional Chipotle eaters, she said. 

Overall, quinoa packs the same amount of protein and significantly more fiber but has only a little over half the calories as the rice option. 

A four-ounce serving of the white rice has 210 calories, four grams of fat, 40 grams of carbohydrates, one gram of fiber, and one gram of protein.

The brown rice option also has 210 calories, six grams of fat, 36 grams of carbohydrates, two grams of fiber and four grams of protein.

In comparison, a half-cup of cooked quinoa (185g) has 111 calories, two grams of fat, 20 grams of carbohydrates, two-and-a-half grams of fiber and four grams of protein.

‘Quinoa has a higher protein content so it’s good for vegetarians and it’s got more essential amino acids, which are big right now,’ Weinandy said. 

Quinoa also has high levels of several vitamins and minerals including magnesium, manganese and folate.

It provides nearly 10 percent of the daily recommended allowance of iron, whereas white and brown rice provide only three and four percent respectively.

Some customers are thrilled by the nutty new addition while others were not impressed.

The new option is prepared by tossing red and gold quinoa with citrus juice, rice bran oil, cilantro and cumin.

It was introduced at Chipotle’s NEXT test kitchen in New York City on Monday.

‘We are recommending adding it to a salad, or in place of rice in another entrée,’ Chipotle PR director Chris Arnold told Daily Mail Online.

The brand has been working to win back customers after dozens of cases of E.coli were reported by Chipotle customers in Virginia in 2015, driving down sales significantly.

A woman tweeted about the addition: 'I LOVE quinoa!!! I will be a new customer @Chipotle'

A woman tweeted about the addition: 'I LOVE quinoa!!! I will be a new customer @Chipotle'

A woman tweeted about the addition: ‘I LOVE quinoa!!! I will be a new customer @Chipotle’

Another user poked fun at the brand by mentioning its E.Coli outbreak in 2015

Another user poked fun at the brand by mentioning its E.Coli outbreak in 2015

Another user poked fun at the brand by mentioning its E.Coli outbreak in 2015

In September it rolled out a queso option, and last month it brought on former Taco Bell CEO Brian Niccol.

Quinoa – pronounced keen-wah – was first cultivated over 5,000 years ago and was known as ‘the mother of all grains’ to the Incas in Peru.

The naturally gluten-free whole grain is a favorite among nutritionists for several reasons, one being that it’s a complete protein, meaning that it has all nine essential amino acids.

Rice, on the other hand, only has eight of the nine.

Additionally, quinoa is very high in fiber compared to other grains so it can reduce constipation and hemorrhoids and even lower heart disease risk by decreasing blood pressure and cholesterol.

The high fiber content also causes consumers to feel fuller longer, making it a good choice for people trying to lose weight.

One serving of quinoa provides nearly one-third of the recommended daily allowance of manganese, an essential element of development, metabolism and the body’s antioxidant system.

Ovarian rejuvenation offers pregnancy hope after menopause

Doctors claim they can overcome ovarian aging to help women get pregnant, even after menopause.

Recently-developed procedures use surprising techniques – like puncturing the ovaries with needles – to encourage eggs to become fully mature and viable. 

There is little data on these practices, but several fertility clinics have used them to help a handful of women get pregnant when all else has failed. 

Two experts explained their methods to bring new life to aging ovaries to Daily Mail Online. 

Ovarian rejuvenation uses novel procedures, like puncturing the ovaries (white) in order to stimulate older women's eggs to reach a viable stage of development 

Ovarian rejuvenation uses novel procedures, like puncturing the ovaries (white) in order to stimulate older women's eggs to reach a viable stage of development 

Ovarian rejuvenation uses novel procedures, like puncturing the ovaries (white) in order to stimulate older women’s eggs to reach a viable stage of development 

For women, fertility begins to decline after age 30 and accelerates after 35. 

By 40, a woman only has about a five percent chance of getting pregnant during any given month, as opposed to about a 20 percent chance during peak fertility.

As far as scientists can tell, women are born with all of the eggs that they will have throughout their life already formed and intact.

While men’s bodies continue to produce new sperm consistently throughout the course of their lives, women have a finite number of eggs, estimated to be around one million at birth.  

Each of these eggs, which are immature, or not fully developed, are contained in a follicle. The follicles develop at constantly and at different rates.

Each menstrual cycle, a number of these are competing to deliver the single healthiest egg during ovulation. 

Once that egg selected, the rest of the group of competing follicles dies. 

Many more follicles will never develop beyond their first, or primordial, state, remaining dormant in a woman’s ovaries even after menopause.  

The number of competing eggs decreases over the course of a woman’s life.  By a woman’s late thirties, there may only be one or two eggs in the running for fertilization. 

As the ovaries age, they are unable to process the hormones that should stimulate follicles to develop, meaning that fewer eggs reach the viable stage of development.

About one percent of all women experience premature ovarian failure (POF), meaning that their ovaries stop working before they are 40. 

For these – and the growing number of women who elect to wait to have children until their mid- or late-thirties – the goal of fertility treatments is to ensure that there are as many healthy potential eggs for the body to choose from as possible.   

‘Today, as opposed to in the past, women have the opportunity to delay childbearing,’ says Dr David Barad, a fertility specialist at the Center for Human Reproduction in New York City.

‘So we wend up with a group of very accomplished women who have achieved much in their life but, at some point, decide they want to have children, but maybe a little later than their mothers or grandmothers had children, and this is the primary group that might be looking for this kind of rejuvenation treatment,’ he says.

Any tissue, when injured, produces growth factors that are intended to promote the repair of tissues 

 Dr David Barad, Center for Human Reporduction

Dr Barad is beginning a clinical trial for a new variation on ovarian rejuvenation in April.

For years, his clinic has used a sort of pseudo-regeneration, using a steroid hormone to help ‘improve the environment in which the follicles are developing.’  

But rejuvenating the organs themselves is a more complicated process. Researchers in Japan and California have experimented with removing the ovaries, prodding them and treating them with a growth hormone to promote healthier follicles, and, therefore, eggs.

The Japanese team’s work resulted in one successful pregnancy out of 27 patients, but the required procedures are fairly extensive and a bit medieval. 

Dr Barad says that other similar efforts have used stem cells and transplants of parts of younger women’s ovarian cells to try to encourage the growth of new follicles or ‘recharge’ old ones, but these methods, he says, came a bit too close to cloning for the comfort of most. 

Though it sounds counter-intuitive, injuring the ovaries may actually make them behave as if they are younger, in reproductive terms. 

‘For about the last year, with patients who appear to be the worst-responders [to other fertility treatments], we have been using repeated needle punctures to induce some injury to the ovaries,’ he explains. 

‘Any tissue, when injured, produces growth factors that are intended to promote the repair of tissues. These are similar to the growth factors that the Japanese [researchers] used in their protocol,’ Dr Barad says.  

Platelets in blood plasma also contain growth factors that help to heal damaged tissues.

The number of follicles, which contain immature eggs, declines over course of a woman's life

The number of follicles, which contain immature eggs, declines over course of a woman's life

The number of follicles, which contain immature eggs, declines over course of a woman’s life

These can be activated by spinning blood around in a centrifuge. Dr Barad says he will draw a woman’s own blood, give it a spin, then inject it back into her ovaries while simultaneously puncturing them in the hopes that the one-two-punch of growth factor will wake up exhausted follicles so they yield more viable eggs.

This, too, might sound a bit medieval, but Dr Barad says patients can rest assured that they will be under anesthesia and that he will be ‘using the same sort of needle that we would for egg retrieval, so we have a lot of experience poking ovaries with them.’  

At New Hope Fertility Clinic, also located in New York City, Dr Zaher Merhi has begun doing rejuvenation procedures using only the needle-sticks. 

He says that after the procedure, two out of six patients he has treated have had successful pregnancies through IVF. 

Dr Barad says: ‘Nothing will make an ovary 20 years old again, the thousands of used follicles are gone, but what we are trying to do is utilize the remaining follicles in the way that’s most helpful.’ 

Because the treatment stimulates primordial follicles that still lie dormant after menopause, the treatment could even help post-menopausal women get pregnant, in theory.   

‘We have to look for ways of trying to help people get pregnant. The existing way is to use eggs from someone else, but some want to hang onto their genes, for good reason. 

The thought for many women is: ‘”[I want to] look at my child’s face and see my grandmother’s eyes.” We’re tied to our families and tied to our genes, and people are looking for that,’ Dr Barad says.   

Women likely to pick more effective birth control

When cost is not considered, women pick more effective forms of contraception, new research suggests.

Research shows that 62 percent of all women of reproductive age are currently using a contraceptive method, but less than 10 percent of those women are using the most effective forms available, such as intrauterine devices (IUDs) and subdermal implants.

A study by researchers from the University of Utah provided no-cost birth control to 7,400 women and found that when price wasn’t an issue, women were twice as likely to pick the most effective methods available.

The researchers say the findings could be applied to revolutionize contraceptive care across the country.  

A study by the University of Utah gave birth control to 7,400 women and found without having cost as an issue, participants were twice as likely to choose the most effective methods such as IUDs (stock image)

A study by the University of Utah gave birth control to 7,400 women and found without having cost as an issue, participants were twice as likely to choose the most effective methods such as IUDs (stock image)

A study by the University of Utah gave birth control to 7,400 women and found without having cost as an issue, participants were twice as likely to choose the most effective methods such as IUDs (stock image)

The most common method used is the pill, used by 26 percent of American women according to a 2012 survey. When taken perfectly, the pill is 99 percent effective, but because it is nearly impossible to take it perfectly, approximately 9 in 100 pill users will get pregnant every year.

IUDs and implants are considered the most effective methods because they are more permanent and have less chance of human error.

However, only 6.4 percent of birth control users have the IUD and 0.8 percent have the implant.

A key reason for the low rates of IUDs and implants is cost, with both ranging from $0 to $1,300 depending on type and insurance.

Researchers from the University of Utah created the HER Salt Lake Contraceptive Initiative (HER Salt Lake) to evaluate how women choose contraception if cost is not a factor.

HER Salt Lake worked within existing Planned Parenthood clinics, removing all cost obstacles and allowing participants to pick from all effective forms of birth control available with the option to change methods at any time.

There are approximately eight types of reversible female birth control available, and women often have to try several types of birth control before finding the best fit.

‘There really is a contraceptive journey that women go through to find the best fit. There’s not one best option, which is why we wanted women to be able to switch at no cost,’ Jessica Sanders, PhD, a lead author of the study said.

In addition, HER Salt Lake ensured clinics were stocked and had providers on site to facilitate the requested care on the same day. 

By eliminating the cost barrier, HER Salt Lake was able to get a more accurate gauge of women’s interest in each method.

‘I was blown away by the number of women who accessed care when cost was removed,’ said Sanders.

‘We thought we might recruit 2,500 women [for the study], but we almost doubled that number.’

In total, the initiative provided no-cost contraception to 7,400 women and enrolled more than 4,400 women in the three-year study.

‘The Family Planning research team at University of Utah has worked for a decade [to] overcome a number of different barriers to help women access different methods of contraception,’ said Turok, senior author on the study. 

‘Our research partnership with Planned Parenthood enables us to study the effect of a community-wide intervention that expands the availability of all contraceptive methods to women in Salt Lake County.’

The study was divided into three six-month segments: a control, Intervention 1, and Intervention 2.

The control period set the baseline for what birth control methods women typically selected based on data from Planned Parenthood clinics in Salt Lake County.

For Intervention 1, women seeking services at the same clinics were offered no-cost, same-day access to the contraceptive method of their choice.

In the second intervention, the researchers added an educational component by launching a campaign online.

The study found that women in Intervention 1 were 1.6 times more likely to use an IUD and 2.5 times more likely to use an IUD in Intervention 2 compared to women who enrolled during the control period.

In the next three years, the researchers will send periodic surveys to women enrolled to track the how universal access to family planning influences educational attainment, financial mobility, and sexual satisfaction.

Sanders said the study was based on previous research in Iowa, Colorado and Missouri that found the removal of financial impediments resulted in a higher acceptance of IUDs and implants.

HER Salt Lake is unique because it worked through clinics that were already providing family planning services.

With this study we tried to bolster what clinics in the area were already doing for patients,’ Sanders said.

The team hopes to extent the initiative to other communities in Utah and beyond.

‘Theoretically speaking, this same approach could be used across the country. We’ve learned a lot of different lessons that could be applied to other community initiatives,’ Sanders said.

O’Sullivan thrashes Guodong at the World Grand Prix

  • O’Sullivan made four centuries in a 5-0 victory at Preston’s Guild Hall on Friday
  • He will now take on Stephen Maguire after he overcame Shaun Murphy 5-2
  • Mark Selby beating Neil Robertson 4-0 to make it to the quarter-finals

Press Association

Ronnie O’Sullivan made four centuries as he thrashed Xiao Guodong 5-0 to reach the semi-finals of the Ladbrokes World Grand Prix at Preston’s Guild Hall.

O’Sullivan opened with runs of 105, 102 and 101 to race into a 4-0 lead at the interval before claiming the final frame with another ton immediately after the resumption.

‘I do sometimes praise myself and that was a very good match,’ O’Sullivan told ITV.

Ronnie O'Sullivan made four centuries as he thrashed Xiao Guodong 5-0 on Friday

Ronnie O'Sullivan made four centuries as he thrashed Xiao Guodong 5-0 on Friday

Ronnie O’Sullivan made four centuries as he thrashed Xiao Guodong 5-0 on Friday

‘I can play like that quite a lot of the time, so you can understand when I don’t play like that why I get frustrated.

‘I think a lot of it is to do with looking after myself. I’ve been working with a nutritionist and I feel like I’ve got more energy and feel a lot healthier.

‘I think I have a slight advantage because I don’t need to chase ranking points and I’m not motivated by that. So I come in a lot fresher and that is where my longevity will come through.’

His opponent in the last four will be Stephen Maguire after he overcame Shaun Murphy 5-2.

Mark Selby also impressed in beating Neil Robertson 4-0 to make it to the quarter-finals, which will also feature Michael White, Ding Junhui and Anthony McGill following their victories.

 

Lack of focus cost Arsenal against Ostersunds, says Wenger

Arsene Wenger accused his Arsenal team of complacency and a lack of focus after they risked an embarrassing elimination from the Europa League with a 2-1 home defeat by Ostersunds.

The French manager also insisted that despite concerns surrounding Jack Wilshere and Alex Iwobi, who were substituted late on, both will be fit for Sunday’s Carabao Cup final against Manchester City.

Having built a convincing 3-0 lead during the away leg at their little-known Swedish opponents, Wenger named an under-strength team in preparation for Sunday’s Wembley final and watched his team struggle and fall two goals down by half-time.

Arsene Wenger had plenty to moan about in Arsenal's 2-1 defeat by Ostersunds

Arsene Wenger had plenty to moan about in Arsenal's 2-1 defeat by Ostersunds

Arsene Wenger had plenty to moan about in Arsenal’s 2-1 defeat by Ostersunds

Of his leading players only Hector Bellerin and Wilshere started as an own goal from Calum Chambers and Ken Sema’s finish, both of which came within 70 first-half seconds, betrayed a lack of composure.

Only after Sead Kolasinac’s fine second-half strike did the pressure that had been building begin to ease, and Wenger said: ‘We were not at the races in the first half.

‘The second half was much better and we should have scored some more goals: our energy was higher and we were in control. In the first half we were in trouble and in danger because we were complacent and not focused.

Thursday's Europa League defeat compounded a torrid display from Wenger's men

Thursday's Europa League defeat compounded a torrid display from Wenger's men

Thursday’s Europa League defeat compounded a torrid display from Wenger’s men

‘We were open every time we lost the ball and had no ideas, and that’s why we were in trouble. Overall we responded well and did the job to qualify, and that’s what you have to keep from the night.

‘We prepared properly but you have external circumstances. The fact that we won 3-0 (in the away leg), we have another big game on Sunday, that people subconsciously think you just have to turn up to win: football doesn’t work like that.

‘It’s what you see in the FA Cup: you can be in trouble every time you’re not 100 per cent focused. Against Nottingham Forest we were beaten, because we were not at the level that was demanded.’

Wenger slammed his side for their lack of focus throughout the Europa League tie

Wenger slammed his side for their lack of focus throughout the Europa League tie

Wenger slammed his side for their lack of focus throughout the Europa League tie

Jack Wilshere is replaced in anticipation of Sunday's Carabao Cup final with Manchester City

Jack Wilshere is replaced in anticipation of Sunday's Carabao Cup final with Manchester City

Jack Wilshere is replaced in anticipation of Sunday’s Carabao Cup final with Manchester City

Asked about Iwobi and then Wilshere, Wenger responded: ‘Iwobi just had cramp. Wilshere’s not injured. He was OK.’

Ostersunds manager Graham Potter, from England, has further enhanced his reputation despite his team missing out on the Europa League’s last 16.

‘I’m incredibly proud of the performance,’ he said. ‘We talked about trying to play well, win the match and hope for the miracle. We got two out of three.

‘I left (England) seven years ago to a club that didn’t really have anything, so for me to see 5,000 people get on a plane and come here, to see the pride and connection with the club, is a wonderful feeling of pride.

‘For a club of our stature, to compete with this institution is a credit to the players and everyone connected with the club.

‘There are some good teams in Sweden, good players and good coaches. I’d like to think we can inspire other Swedish teams to go out in Europe and show what they’re about.

‘We’ve got a Swedish Cup match on Monday, so it’s back down to earth, back to reality.’ 

Wenger admitted Arsenal were again victim to below-par performances and must improve

Wenger admitted Arsenal were again victim to below-par performances and must improve

Wenger admitted Arsenal were again victim to below-par performances and must improve

Pardew defends Jonny Evans’ captain reinstatement

  • Jonny Evans and four other West Brom players stole a taxi in Barcelona 
  • Evans was stripped as the captain for last weekend’s Southampton clash
  • Alan Pardew will reinstate Evans as captain for Saturday’s Huddersfield game
  • The West Brom boss defended his decision, claiming he has paid a heavy price

Laurie Whitwell for MailOnline

Alan Pardew has defended his decision to reinstate Jonny Evans as West Bromwich Albion captain for Saturday’s crunch contest against Huddersfield and attempted to draw a line on the taxi episode that embarrassed the club.

The West Brom manager said the events in Barcelona had contributed to one of the toughest weeks of his career, with defeats by Chelsea and Southampton and the dismissal of the club’s chairman and chief executive also included.

Pardew stripped Evans of the armband for last weekend’s FA Cup tie against Southampton and the Northern Ireland defender has been fined the maximum two weeks’ wages, alongside Gareth Barry, Jake Livermore, and Boaz Myhill, the other members of the so-called ‘Cab Four’.

Jonny Evans was stripped of the West Brom captaincy by manager Alan Pardew

Jonny Evans was stripped of the West Brom captaincy by manager Alan Pardew

Jonny Evans was stripped of the West Brom captaincy by manager Alan Pardew

‘The most important thing from Jonny’s perspective was his performance last Saturday,’ said Pardew. ‘That was a very difficult game for him and Barry. He showed real character to come through that and so he should. This weekend he needs to prove to me, the fans and the club that he’s the right man to lead us.

‘The disciplinary side of it is finished as far as I’m concerned. It’s like all things, if you make a mistake, does that mean you are going to have to pay for it for the rest of your life? I don’t think so. I think God teaches us to forgive. On this occasion I wouldn’t say that he’s been forgiven. But he’s paid a heavy price so he’ll learn that was an event he deeply regrets.’

Pardew claimed he reacted well during their FA Cup tie with Southampton

Pardew claimed he reacted well during their FA Cup tie with Southampton

Pardew claimed he reacted well during their FA Cup tie with Southampton

All four players are available to feature against Huddersfield and Pardew added: ‘Trust me, the guys have apologised more than enough. They really have. Now it’s about us showing some kind of backing to them. We have to say: “OK, you made a major error, come on guys, let’s get on with it”.

‘It’s been a rough week. I would say that it’s been one of my toughest weeks as a manager. I genuinely feel for this club and it hurts me that it’s hurt so many people.’

Scrutiny has mounted on Pardew’s position after owner Guochuan Lai’s ruthless boardroom cull of John Williams and Martin Goodman, and many see the match against David Wagner’s side, who are seven points above in 17th, as a must-win in the battle to survive relegation.

‘The words ‘must win’ are a bit of an irritant but we know how important it is,’ Pardew said. ‘Nothing’s over until it’s over. The fat lady isn’t in the room yet.’

He claimed he has paid a heavy price and he will captain them against Huddersfield

He claimed he has paid a heavy price and he will captain them against Huddersfield

He claimed he has paid a heavy price and he will captain them against Huddersfield

Anesthesia may cause memory problems

Getting a knee replacement may lead to memory problems later on, new research claims.

Scientists found middle-aged patients who were given general anesthesia before surgery performed slightly worse on memory tests.

Researchers said this was due to cognitive changes in the brain related to immediate memory, or the ability to remember information over a brief period,

The findings, published in the journal Anaesthesia, are the latest to link anesthesia to memory loss.

Surgery and anesthesia could lead to memory problems, new research claims

Surgery and anesthesia could lead to memory problems, new research claims

Surgery and anesthesia could lead to memory problems, new research claims

‘The cognitive changes after surgery are small – most probably asymptomatic and beneath a person’s awareness,’ said senior author Dr Kirk Hogan, a professor of anesthesiology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

For the study, Dr Hogan and his colleagues measured memory and executive function in 964 participants, with the average age of 54, who had no signs of Alzheimer’s disease, dementia, or cognitive impairment before surgery.

Of the participants, 312 of them had at least one surgical procedure performed and 652 of them did not.

Researchers found there was a decline in immediate memory over the course of four years in participants who had surgery.

Memory became abnormal in 18 percent of those who had at least one surgical procedure compared with 10 percent of those who had not. 

Regarding the working memory test, surgery and anesthesia were associated with a decline in immediate memory by one point out of a possible maximum test score of 30 points.

They found no differences in other measures of memory and executive function between those who had surgery and their counterparts. 

‘Taken together, these data suggest that patients having surgery and anesthesia are more likely to experience impaired performance on neuropsychological tests of memory and executive function, an association that might be causal,’ researchers wrote in the study.

This isn’t the first study to link anesthesia with brain changes and memory loss.

A 2014 study published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation found that a third of patients who undergo anesthesia and surgery experience some kind of cognitive impairment – including confusion and poor brain functioning.

The four-year-old study suggests this has something to do with memory-loss receptors in the brain, which are activated by anesthetic drugs to ensure patients don’t remember traumatic events during surgery.

Researchers found the activity of memory loss receptors remains high long after the drugs have been eliminated from the patient’s body.    

Furthermore, a 2016 study published in the journal Anaesthesia found cognitive decline in elderly patients increased after surgery.

However, experts said other risk factors like the sort of disease or illness a person have could impact brain function.

Michael Avidan, an anesthesiologist and researcher at Washington University in St. Louis, told PBS that certain diseases like hypertension and diabetes may also be responsible for cognitive decline in patients who have had surgery.

‘Whether or not they undergo surgery I can predict that those people are going to decline cognitively more than people who are marathon runners who are fit,’ said Avidan, who was not involved in the study.

However, Dr Hogan noted that it is too early to recommend any changes in clinical practice regarding prevention, diagnosis, management, and prognosis of cognitive changes after surgery.

Tears could diagnose Parkinson’s | Daily Mail Online

Shedding tears could help tell if you have Parkinson’s disease, a new study found.

Biomarkers could be simply detected in tears enabling doctors to diagnose the neurological illness that affects one in 500 people.

Scientists found there were minute differences in the levels of a particular protein shed in tears.

The test could help detect the disease years before symptoms develop allowing doctors to prescribe treatments such as drugs to restore dopamine in the brain.

Researchers found differences in the levels of a particular protein, alpha-synuclein, in the tears of people with Parkinson's compared to controls

Researchers found differences in the levels of a particular protein, alpha-synuclein, in the tears of people with Parkinson's compared to controls

Researchers found differences in the levels of a particular protein, alpha-synuclein, in the tears of people with Parkinson’s compared to controls

The disease, which affects 127,000 Britons and 600,000 Americans, is incurable and causes involuntary shaking of particular parts of the body, slow movement and stiff and inflexible muscles.  

Professor of neurology Dr Mark Lew said: ‘We believe our research is the first to show that tears may be a reliable, inexpensive and noninvasive biological marker of Parkinson’s disease.’

He explained tears contain various proteins produced by the secretory cells of the tear gland, which is stimulated by nerves to secrete these proteins into tears.

Because Parkinson’s can affect nerve function outside of the brain, researchers hypothesised any change in nerve function may be seen in the protein levels in tears.

The study involved taking tear samples from 55 people with Parkinson’s and comparing theses to tear samples from 27 people without Parkinson’s but who were the same age and gender.

The researchers from the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California in Los Angeles analysed the tear samples for the levels of four proteins.

Researchers found differences in the levels of a particular protein, alpha-synuclein, in the tears of people with Parkinson’s compared to controls.

Additionally, levels of another form of alpha-synuclein, oligomeric alpha-synuclein, which is alpha-synuclein that has formed aggregates that are implicated in nerve damage in Parkinson’s, were also significantly different compared to controls.

They suggested it is also possible the tear gland secretory cells themselves produce these different forms of alpha-synuclein that can be directly secreted into tears.

Total levels of alpha-synuclein were decreased in people with Parkinson’s, with an average of 423 picograms of that protein per milligram (pg/mg) compared to 704 pg/mg in people without Parkinson’s.

But levels of oligomeric alpha-synuclein were increased in people with Parkinson’s, with an average of 1.45 nanograms per milligram of tear protein (ng/mg) compared to 0.27 ng/mg in people without the disease.

A picogram is 1,000 times smaller than a nanogram.

Professor Lew concluded: ‘Knowing that something as simple as tears could help neurologists differentiate between people who have Parkinson’s disease and those who don’t in a noninvasive manner is exciting.

‘And because the Parkinson’s disease process can begin years or decades before symptoms appear, a biological marker like this could be useful in diagnosing, or even treating, the disease earlier.’

Further studies are planned in larger groups to investigate whether these protein changes can be detected in tears in the earliest stages of the disease, before symptoms start.

The findings of the preliminary study was presented at the American Academy of Neurology’s 70th Annual Meeting in Los Angeles.