Enrique Iglesias pictured for first time since twins birth

He’s just spent his first Christmas as a dad.

And on December 25, Enrique Iglesias was coolly taking new fatherhood in his stride as he strolled near his Miami waterfront mansion with his dogs.

The Spanish crooner was spotted with his Chesapeake Bay Retriever and his German Shepherd grabbing some air along the oceanside path. 

New dad: Enrique Iglesias was spotted walking his dogs near his Miami waterfront mansion on Christmas Day, one week after welcoming twins with longtime partner Anna Kournoikova

New dad: Enrique Iglesias was spotted walking his dogs near his Miami waterfront mansion on Christmas Day, one week after welcoming twins with longtime partner Anna Kournoikova

New dad: Enrique Iglesias was spotted walking his dogs near his Miami waterfront mansion on Christmas Day, one week after welcoming twins with longtime partner Anna Kournoikova

The 42-year-old and longtime partner Anna Kournikova, 36, surprised everyone with the news that they had welcomed twins on December 16.

The notoriously private couple had managed to keep the pregnancy under wraps.

They are now proud parents to son, Nicholas, and daughter, Lucy, with Enrique’s mom Isabel Preysler telling Hola! magazine: ‘Enrique is extraordinarily happy in these moments.’

Cool cat: The 42-year-old Spanish singer appeared to be taking new fatherhood in his stride as he got some air wearing a t-shirt, camo pants and a baseball cap 

Cool cat: The 42-year-old Spanish singer appeared to be taking new fatherhood in his stride as he got some air wearing a t-shirt, camo pants and a baseball cap 

Cool cat: The 42-year-old Spanish singer appeared to be taking new fatherhood in his stride as he got some air wearing a t-shirt, camo pants and a baseball cap 

His boys: The son of crooner Julio Iglesias dotes on his Chesapeake Bay Retriever and his German Shepherd and often shares images of them to his Instagram

His boys: The son of crooner Julio Iglesias dotes on his Chesapeake Bay Retriever and his German Shepherd and often shares images of them to his Instagram

His boys: The son of crooner Julio Iglesias dotes on his Chesapeake Bay Retriever and his German Shepherd and often shares images of them to his Instagram

Enrique and Anna have been together for 16 years since meeting on the set of the hitmaker’s music video for Escape.

They moved into their $26 million waterfront Miami mansion in 2013, complete with a tennis court and sapphire-tinged lap pool and jacuzzi.

The 20,000-square-foot house is located in the Bay Point community, and is surrounded by palm trees, high hedges, and a lush green lawn. 

Parents: Enrique and Anna, 36, pictured in 2010, surprised everyone with the news they have welcomed a son Nicholas and a daughter Lucy after keeping the pregnancy under wraps

Parents: Enrique and Anna, 36, pictured in 2010, surprised everyone with the news they have welcomed a son Nicholas and a daughter Lucy after keeping the pregnancy under wraps

Parents: Enrique and Anna, 36, pictured in 2010, surprised everyone with the news they have welcomed a son Nicholas and a daughter Lucy after keeping the pregnancy under wraps

Partners:  The notoriously private couple met on the 2001 set of Enrique's music video for Escape and have been together ever since

Partners:  The notoriously private couple met on the 2001 set of Enrique's music video for Escape and have been together ever since

Partners:  The notoriously private couple met on the 2001 set of Enrique’s music video for Escape and have been together ever since

Anna and Enrique are notoriously secretive about their relationship and haven’t been seen together in public for nearly a year.

Last year Anna sparked marriage speculation when she began sporting a large diamond ring and matching eternity band on her wedding finger.

However, in an interview this past summer, Enrique revealed that despite the length of time they’ve been together, he and Moscow-born beauty Anna have no immediate plans to get married.

Enrique claimed they already live the life of a married couple in many ways. 

Enrique once raised eyebrows when he introduced Anna as his wife during a concert in Russia in 2011.

But the musician claimed he simply got caught up in the moment, adding that being married or not has no bearing on how much he loves his long-time partner. 

Mom's the word? Moscow-born Anna posted a photo on Instagram this month, featuring herself on a boat with her figure swamped by an Iglesias tour jacket

Mom's the word? Moscow-born Anna posted a photo on Instagram this month, featuring herself on a boat with her figure swamped by an Iglesias tour jacket

Mom’s the word? Moscow-born Anna posted a photo on Instagram this month, featuring herself on a boat with her figure swamped by an Iglesias tour jacket

 

Tebbit gave up the chance to be PM to care for his wife

Norman Tebbit’s hair was standing on end when Callum McCarthy, his Parliamentary Private Secretary at the Department of Trade and Industry (DTI), visited him in the Royal Sussex County Hospital after the IRA bombed Brighton’s Grand Hotel.

‘Secretary of State, what happened to your hair?’ the civil servant inquired.

‘Oh that,’ Tebbit nonchalantly replied, ‘was when I was electrocuted.’

It wasn’t a joke. He’d been trapped in the rubble for hours, with cold water gushing over him and occasional shocks from severed electricity cables.

‘He looked pretty rough,’ says Ruth Thompson, his private secretary, another early visitor. ‘We could see lots of cuts and bruises on his face and hands. He was perfectly conscious and compos mentis, but he was talking like someone who’d had a profound shock, not surprisingly.

Norman Tebbit gave up the chance to be PM to care for his wife after she was injured in the Brighton bombing

Norman Tebbit gave up the chance to be PM to care for his wife after she was injured in the Brighton bombing

Norman Tebbit gave up the chance to be PM to care for his wife after she was injured in the Brighton bombing

‘We didn’t stay long, just enough to let him know we were there. He was very matter-of-fact, as you would expect of him. He wanted us to let people know he was still alive and kicking.

‘We then started to think about how to put things back together again. But we had no idea how long he was going to be in hospital. We also knew that his wife, Margaret, had been really badly injured.’

How badly soon became apparent to the public when a freelance journalist in Brighton sold a story to a Sunday paper, based on a conversation he’d had with a nurse going off duty, who’d said Mrs Tebbit was paralysed. The hospital authorities confirmed that this was the case.

But Tebbit was not about to give up. It wasn’t in his nature. For good reason he was known in politics as the ‘Chingford Skinhead’ — after his North-East London constituency — because of his tough reputation.

He recalls: ‘By the Monday after the bomb on Friday, my private secretary had set up a temporary ministerial office at the hospital. There was no discussion about whether such an unusual arrangement was possible, because the Prime Minister had said it was. So did I.’

According to his private secretary, Andrew Lansley, ‘we were clear, and he was clear, that, though he was badly injured physically, his faculties were absolutely OK and he was going to carry on.

‘We set up an arrangement to handle the day-to-day business in the department and make sure we bothered him only with the things he really wanted to know about. Within days, he was pretty much engaged. He didn’t expect to see all the paperwork, but he did expect his senior civil servants to be telling him what was going on and giving them his views.’

Lansley made sure an early visit was seen by the Press. ‘I was on the news carrying in a red box, the purpose of which was to say to the world: “He’s all right, and he’s still in charge.” ’ In fact, the red box contained get-well-soon cards.

Another bedside regular was his Sussex Police protection officer, Brian Etheridge. One hospital consultant ‘was very regimental’ about making sure visitors didn’t tire the minister out, ‘because he was quite weak’, Etheridge says. ‘He was being fed through tubes.

HIS SURGEON’S MEDICINE? A CASE OF RED WINE… 

 ‘Are you normally fit and healthy?’ a Stoke Mandeville surgeon asked Norman Tebbit.

‘Healthy, yes; fit, no.’

‘What exercise do you take?’

‘I have never knowingly taken gratuitous exercise in my life.’

‘Oh dear. Do you smoke?’

‘No.’

‘Oh, that’s better. Do you drink?’

‘Yes.’

‘What do you drink?’

‘Mostly red wine and whisky . . .’

‘Well, I want you to put on some weight, because you’re as skinny as hell. So eat as much as you can, and to help you in that process I’ll send in a case of red wine.’

‘His main concern was his wife. What made him angry was that she had really had nothing to do with what happened. She was there at the conference because of him. And she’d been injured, badly. We didn’t speak a lot about it, because he wanted to talk about anything other than the bomb.’

When a journalist was allowed to interview him, Tebbit said he’d got several broken ribs: ‘I am sure somebody knows how many, but I haven’t bothered to count. I have a deep cut on my left side. It is a bit slow to heal, because you cannot just bandage it up. I simply have to sit here and ooze. But overall I am not in too much pain.’

He concealed the full extent of his injuries so as, he later explained, not to ‘give satisfaction to those who had committed the bombing. Nor to any of my colleagues or my opponents. I didn’t want them to have any doubts that I was going to be back on song.’

Margaret Thatcher was clear that his job was waiting whenever he was ready to resume it full time, Tebbit recalls, though ‘obviously she must have had in mind the thought: “Is Norman going to make it? Is he going to recover?”

‘My department covered a pretty wide waterfront in those days. She must have wondered how long she could have a Secretary of State who wasn’t really carrying a full load of Cabinet work.’ After a fortnight, the Tebbits were transferred to Stoke Mandeville Hospital near Aylesbury, so Margaret could be treated at its specialist spinal- injuries unit.

The helicopter journey from Brighton was planned in secret. Ambulances and police cars were drawn up to the front of the hospital, while they were smuggled out of the back and taken to a nearby school playing field.

While Tebbit had wanted to walk the short distance to the field, as he recalled, ‘I was overruled by a female wing commander who insisted I go on a stretcher. Which I didn’t want to do, because I thought the sooner I was seen to be able to walk, the better.

For good reason he was known in politics as the ‘Chingford Skinhead’ — after his North-East London constituency — because of his tough reputation.

For good reason he was known in politics as the ‘Chingford Skinhead’ — after his North-East London constituency — because of his tough reputation.

For good reason he was known in politics as the ‘Chingford Skinhead’ — after his North-East London constituency — because of his tough reputation.

‘But she outranked me. I’d been a flying officer in the RAF, so I obeyed orders.’

At Stoke Mandeville, Tebbit had three private secretaries and a diary secretary, and there was always at least one on site. Lansley says: ‘We were very focused on keeping him up to speed on work, because it was good therapy for him. Otherwise he would just dwell on Margaret’s injuries, and that wasn’t going to help him at all.’

Ruth Thompson says: ‘More things were delegated to his junior ministers [Ken Baker, Norman Lamont and Paul Channon]. But a lot of things weren’t. He seemed to me to be amazingly on the ball.’

Tebbit says: ‘Without having something to do, I would have become introspective, and thought too much about my own injuries. And more particularly my wife’s injuries, as it gradually became clear that she was not going to make much recovery. I had to think through how we would manage, which was quite complicated.’

As a couple, they had been very dependent on each other. Now her disability meant a profound and lifetime change.

‘It was as if he felt that he was partly responsible,’ Ruth Thompson says. ‘He was the one who’d gone into public life, and look what had happened to her. Was he feeling guilty? I don’t know. He wouldn’t have used the word. Did he feel shattered by it? He probably did.’

Tebbit was still a sick man. Soon after moving to Stoke Mandeville, he had a serious operation on his thigh, from which a large chunk of flesh had been gouged out as he lay in the rubble of what had been his room in the Grand Hotel.

He also had to have part of his pelvis removed, a skin graft, and then another one when the initial one didn’t work properly.

He admits this was ‘annoying’, but denies it stopped him working. ‘It’s not only whores that work flat on their back, you know.’

The DTI’s key business at the time of the Brighton bombing was the privatisation of British Telecom. ‘It had to be taken through on the schedule that we’d set,’ Tebbit recalls.

Key decisions, about the pricing and allocation of shares, couldn’t be postponed. He agreed the price for the share flotation with Nigel Lawson, the Chancellor, while lying in bed. ‘So by then I was obviously, very much back in the driving seat again.’

Sir Brian Hayes, joint permanent secretary at Tebbit’s department, says: ‘For practical purposes, he was never absent. Very quickly after the bomb, he was seeing the papers. His brain was working as it always did — very effectively.’ But if anyone thought they could relax in his absence, they were in for a shock. An unnamed official was quoted in the Financial Times: ‘He’s not here but on the other hand, he’s around, and from time to time, makes his presence felt.’

Another anonymous source told the paper: ‘You’re sitting there enjoying the freedom of having the boss away, then you look through your in-tray and find a brief missive saying: “Hope you’re not spending too much of my money while I’m away,” and it’s signed by Tebbit.’

Nobody had any idea when he’d be back. ‘In the beginning,’ says Ruth Thompson, ‘a fortnight was talked about. But that wasn’t realistic, because his injuries were found to be worse than had been thought and he had to have skin grafts and the like.

‘So people quickly got used to the new arrangement, though they didn’t like it. Every civil servant wants to be able to eyeball the minister about difficult decisions. But nobody could complain. It was palpably not his fault that he couldn’t see them.’

But not all Tebbit’s bedside visitors were government officials. One day, Fred Bishop, the fire fighter who’d pulled him out of the debris of the Grand, arrived with two colleagues. They’d been sent for by Tebbit’s doctors with a specific purpose in mind

Bishop says: ‘His physical state was very bad, but his mental state was what they were concerned about. They wanted us there because he’d have to discuss the incident with us. It was the only thing we had in common, really.

‘We got him talking. Afterwards, the doctors said to us: “Brilliant, he’s opened up at last.” ’

Tebbit had been in danger of internalising the whole experience, which would not have been good. Now, after his chat with the firemen, in the words of his doctors, he was ‘coming back up again’.

Bishop also saw Margaret Tebbit at Stoke Mandeville. When he went into her room, she said excitedly: ‘Fred, look at this,’ and she raised her arm, very slightly.

‘Margaret, that’s magic.’

‘Yeah — but I can’t put it down. Can you put it down for me?’

He was impressed by her sense of humour. He recalls her saying: ‘I’m glad this happened to me and not Norman, being severely damaged and becoming an invalid.’

He marvelled at her stoicism. ‘Margaret, that attitude is absolutely wonderful,’ he told her.

‘No,’ she replied, ‘it’s because he’d be impossible to live with.’

By now Tebbit was proving difficult to keep in hospital, getting, in his own words, ‘p***ed off’ at being stuck in there. So he discharged himself, and returned to his office in London, where a pre-Christmas party was underway to celebrate the BT privatisation.

‘It was my first occasion out of hospital, and it was quite painful being driven there. I arrived and went up in a lift, and as the doors opened, there was a party going on — a pretty good one.

‘So I stood at the door and shouted at the top of my voice: “So that’s what you buggers get up to when I’m not here, is it?”’

The Chingford Skinhead was back. The next month, he made his first post-bomb Cabinet appearance, and said he was looking forward to ‘roughing up the Labour Party before too long’.

Five days later he returned to the Commons despatch box ‘feeling that nervousness a racing-car driver might have the first time he was on the starting line after having had a major accident. I was wondering: “Am I quite as good as I was before?”

‘But I was determined to demonstrate I was the same old Tebbit, and certainly not looking for sympathy. Nor was there any element of Labour going easy on me, because I wasn’t going easy on them. Normal service was resumed.’

But some things had changed. ‘I was back in the office and coping OK, but I had no domestic life, obviously, apart from my visits out to Stoke Mandeville to see Margaret. And so I probably worked longer hours than I would normally have done.

‘Most of the rest of the time I spent in the Commons, because I didn’t have anywhere else to go. I was living in a little flat over Admiralty House, with a lovely view, but it was a bed-sitter, not a place where you particularly want to be. So I would either be at the department at work, or with my mates in the Commons, or I’d be out at Stoke visiting Margaret.’

He also had his protection team. ‘Intelligence showed that the IRA were anxious to finish the job, so my name was high on the list of people they wanted to murder.

‘My protection people went everywhere with me, so that was an additional source of company. It was a curious life, until my wife came out of the hospital, which was quite some time.’

He didn’t suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder, as many caught up in the bombing did. He says: ‘The mind has a great capacity for shoving painful and unwelcome things out of the way. It’s a part of the defence mechanism. And I let that happen.

‘I was fortunate in that I’d got a demanding job, and a lot of people helping me to get back to it. So there was plenty to fill my days, fill my mind, and I didn’t get unduly introspective.

‘It was only quite a bit later, really when my wife came out of hospital, that I began to wonder whether it was fair on her for me to continue in a job that was so demanding of time and concentration. That was when I decided to step down from government.’

He gave up a lot. ‘We all knew that Tebbit could have been Prime Minister,’ Andrew Lansley says. But he put that ambition aside, out of necessity and loyalty.

Lansley explains: ‘The demands that ministerial office place on families and spouses are in their way greater than they are for the minister themselves.

‘Suddenly, with the injuries, he realised what a price Margaret, his Margaret, was having to pay, for the life that he had chosen.

He gave up everything to look after her.

Tebbit remains philosophical about that dark night in October 1984 when his world literally fell in on top of him.

‘People do recover. In World War II, terrible things happened to people but they were not expected to go away and cry, they were expected to get back up and get on with it.

‘Growing up in the war, being bombed, seeing the odd ceiling come down, windows and doors blown in, you were aware of the fragility of life.

‘Nor was having spent the night in an air-raid shelter accepted as an excuse for not having done your homework. And that was reinforced by my time in the RAF and losing colleagues.

‘We weren’t expected to make fusses. And that, I think, was a good preparation for coming a bit unstuck in later life.’

Something Has Gone Wrong: Dealing With The Brighton Bomb by Steven Ramsey is published by Biteback on January 11, 2018, priced £12.99. To order a copy for £10.39 (20 per cent discount), visit mailshop.co.uk/books or call 0844 571 0640, p&p is free on orders over £15. Offer valid until January 17, 2018.

Gabi Grecko posts more naked snaps

On Sunday, she stripped off and went naked as she wished her social media followers a happy New Year. 

And once again Gabi Grecko wore nothing as she shared more sultry snaps to Instagram, on Monday.

The partner of millionaire doctor Geoffrey Edelsten flaunted her surgically enhanced bust, as she posed for mirror shots. 

Scroll down for video 

Back at it AGAIN! Gabi Grecko flaunts her surgically enhanced bust as she posts more naked snaps...after wishing fans a happy New Year by stripping off

Back at it AGAIN! Gabi Grecko flaunts her surgically enhanced bust as she posts more naked snaps...after wishing fans a happy New Year by stripping off

Back at it AGAIN! Gabi Grecko flaunts her surgically enhanced bust as she posts more naked snaps…after wishing fans a happy New Year by stripping off

In one image, Gabi has on a pair of white shorts which she pulls down at her hip, going topless. 

In another, she’s completely naked, showing off her tiny waist and toned figure. 

She captioned the shots the same as her New Year’s Eve images, writing: ‘Corset off. Ready for 2018.’ 

She can't help herself! Gabi also shared this sultry image on Monday

She can't help herself! Gabi also shared this sultry image on Monday

She can’t help herself! Gabi also shared this sultry image on Monday

'Corset off...Ready for 2018!' On Sunday, she stripped off and went naked (seen) as she wished her social media followers a happy New Year

'Corset off...Ready for 2018!' On Sunday, she stripped off and went naked (seen) as she wished her social media followers a happy New Year

‘Corset off…Ready for 2018!’ On Sunday, she stripped off and went naked (seen) as she wished her social media followers a happy New Year

On one snap she posted, in which she has braids, she wrote: ‘Happy New Year!’ 

The pictures come after she debuted her latest rap video for ‘See Me Mad.’ 

In the clip, Gabi wears a crop top and bottoms that are embellished with jewels. 

Keeping busy! They come after she debuted her latest rap video for 'See Me Mad'

Keeping busy! They come after she debuted her latest rap video for 'See Me Mad'

Keeping busy! They come after she debuted her latest rap video for ‘See Me Mad’

Sultry: In the images, Gabi appears to be posing in a mirror in her New York apartment

Sultry: In the images, Gabi appears to be posing in a mirror in her New York apartment

Sultry: In the images, Gabi appears to be posing in a mirror in her New York apartment

She also wears a leopard print outfit. 

It comes days after Gabi confirmed her reunion with former flame, husband Geoffrey Edelsten, 74. 

Sharing snaps to her Instagram of her and the retired doctor, Gabi wrote: ‘Spending Christmas with my husband. GLittA FoXX and Geoffrey Edelsten fo (sic) Eva (sic).’

Raunchy: In the clip, Gabi wears a crop top and bottoms that are embellished with jewels. She also wears a leopard print outfit

Raunchy: In the clip, Gabi wears a crop top and bottoms that are embellished with jewels. She also wears a leopard print outfit

Raunchy: In the clip, Gabi wears a crop top and bottoms that are embellished with jewels. She also wears a leopard print outfit

Back on: It comes days after Gabi confirmed her reunion with former flame, husband Geoffrey Edelsten, 74

Back on: It comes days after Gabi confirmed her reunion with former flame, husband Geoffrey Edelsten, 74

Back on: It comes days after Gabi confirmed her reunion with former flame, husband Geoffrey Edelsten, 74

She also confirmed to a fan in a comment that the pair are back together, writing: ‘Yeah we r (sic).’

The pair, who boast a 46-year age gap, first married in June 2015, before announcing their split the following year.

Gabi and Geoffrey tied the knot in June 2015, in a graffiti-daubed office in Melbourne.

They said ‘I do’ in front of just two witnesses and a celebrant, Paul Lee, with Gabi getting a little confused as to who the latter was.

‘The celebrant is the one that marries us, right?’ she later asked Daily Mail Australia. 

Marriage struggles: The pair, who boast a 46-year age gap, first married in June 2015, before announcing their split the following year

Marriage struggles: The pair, who boast a 46-year age gap, first married in June 2015, before announcing their split the following year

Marriage struggles: The pair, who boast a 46-year age gap, first married in June 2015, before announcing their split the following year

Moussa Dembele disrespected Celtic team-mates

Moussa Dembele’s head is away. The way he behaved after being substituted on Saturday perhaps proved that.

This was something that I didn’t pick up on until I got home. The fact that he got substituted in an Old Firm game — and went straight down the tunnel, got a shower, put his tracksuit on and only then came back out.

Now, if Rangers had scored the winning goal against us when I was in the shower all the players would have been having a go at me after the game.

Celtic striker Moussa Dembele's proved in the Old Firm derby that his mind is not at Parkhead

Celtic striker Moussa Dembele's proved in the Old Firm derby that his mind is not at Parkhead

Celtic striker Moussa Dembele’s proved in the Old Firm derby that his mind is not at Parkhead

Quite rightly, they would have been asking: ‘Where were you? Why weren’t you supporting your team-mates? Why weren’t you out there watching the game on the bench?’

Look, if Celtic were winning 4-0, you could imagine the coaches saying: ‘Listen, Moussa, you’ve done your job mate. Brilliant. Go grab a shower and come back out.’

But other players in that Celtic dressing room are right to say: ‘We’re playing and trying to win a game here. And you’re in there having a shower, getting changed…’

From a player’s point of view, I wouldn’t like it. If you are injured, yes, you go and get an ice pack on. But it made me think. Is he that bothered? Is the intent there? Is he that bothered about the result?

I infamously had my own dugout incident in 2015 after being substituted against Molde in a Europa League game. I regret it to this day and made a public apology for the disrespect I showed to the management team.

But on Saturday, Dembele was disrespecting his team-mates.

Perhaps his head is away and he wants to leave. That really struck me — that probably his time is up. I think there will be little rumbles in the changing room, because it was very, very strange that he did it.

If any other player did it… if Leigh Griffiths did it, for instance, all the talk would have been: ‘Oh, he’s not happy, he’s come off…’

Moussa was back on the pitch with his tracksuit on, clapping fans while wearing a hoodie. I’m thinking: ‘What the …?’

Your team-mates are out there playing against their fiercest rivals in Scotland.

And you’re inside showering up, putting your aftershave on?

I just think, from a player like Griffiths’ point of view, Leigh has had to sit there watching from the bench.

The French striker, who has been linked with a move away, disrespected his team-mates

The French striker, who has been linked with a move away, disrespected his team-mates

The French striker, who has been linked with a move away, disrespected his team-mates

You get on — and the first thing in Moussa’s head isn’t to sit and watch the game, but to go and get showered up. I thought it was very, very strange.

But if his head’s away, it shows me that he’s not all that bothered by the outcome of the game.

Whether we are reading too much into it or not, I don’t think the players will be very happy with Moussa doing that while a game of that importance is going on.

It obviously raises the important question of what happens next. First of all, I need to say that Moussa is a terrific prospect with all of the attributes to be a top, top player — if he’s playing every week.

He’s had a few injury problems with his hamstrings. But, from a development side of things, Celtic are still perfect for him to learn his trade.

Brendan Rodgers is such a good manager that, if he stays, Moussa can keep on improving.

But if he feels that he wants to go and play in the Premier League and the money is right, nobody is going to stand in his way.

If he wants to go, there’s no point in holding on to him — provided the price is right.

I’m sure, if a bid comes in, Brendan, Peter Lawwell and the chairman will consider all the factors.

This is a player who works hard, who is no trouble, who is a match- winner — and someone who is always preferred in the big games, the Champions League ties and the Rangers games.

But he’s a player who has clearly expressed a desire to leave the club. We need to come up with a price that will be acceptable to say: ‘Yep, Moussa, you’re on your way.’

They’re not going to let him go on the cheap.

Unless someone comes in with the money, he will have to sit tight and play ball.

After being subbed off he went straight down the tunnel to the dressing room for a shower

After being subbed off he went straight down the tunnel to the dressing room for a shower

After being subbed off he went straight down the tunnel to the dressing room for a shower

This winter break is long overdue for Celtic players. I heard Brendan Rodgers saying on radio that the Old Firm game was the 38th competitive match for some of his players — a full season already.

They’ve had a quite remarkable 2017, they’re sitting comfortably top of the league and they’ve got one trophy in the cabinet this season already.

But against Rangers, you could see that it’s taken its toll. Especially the Champions League.

The travelling, the mental strain, the training regimes you have to put yourself through just to stay fit as a top professional, it’s all tough.

Celtic would definitely have been thinking that, if they had that little bit extra in their legs, they could have performed much better against a Rangers side who did really well and worked extremely hard.

What’s it like when fatigue takes over? Personally, I used to feel it in the warm-up. You would be alert to the fact that there just wasn’t that zip or energy spike you normally get. I used to have caffeine drinks in the tunnel, energy drinks leading up to the match. But there were times when even that didn’ t work.

The winter break will be a relief for Brendan Rodgers and his busy squad of players at Celtic

The winter break will be a relief for Brendan Rodgers and his busy squad of players at Celtic

The winter break will be a relief for Brendan Rodgers and his busy squad of players at Celtic

Fatigue eventually takes control — and it’s a horrible position to be in, as a player, knowing that you’re underperforming but there’s almost nothing you can do about it. Your body is literally on its last legs.

The Celtic players just didn’t look as if they had that extra pep they had at the start of the season, when they were fast flowing, making so many intelligent runs in behind.

I know people have singled out Scott Sinclair. It’s understandable, because he hit the ground running when he arrived at Celtic, scooping up all the accolades.

But he’s still churning out really good statistics, is still up there in the scoring charts and doing well on the left wing.

Normally, he would have scored a couple of goals against Rangers. But even the top performers aren’t going to light it up in every single game. The winter break will be brilliant for him. He must be running on empty after playing in each and every game so far.

The two-week break will be a massive boost and the rest will do him a power of good.

When he returns I am sure we will see the Scott Sinclair we all fell in love with last season.

On Saturday, Celtic came up against a Rangers team who cancelled each other out.

James Tavernier, Daniel Candeias, Declan John and Josh Windass all worked so hard on the flanks.

With both sets of full-backs attacking and all four wingers tracking back, it meant they covered an enormous amount of ground.

It was frantic, with no sustained control. People would attack, give the ball away, deal with a counter-attack, get it back and then just go again.

And Rangers edged it, in terms of second-half chances once Celtic began to tire.

Motherwell are not a one-man team. But Louis Moult has shown that he is irreplaceable.

When he was playing for them, he changed the whole dynamic of how the team played.

He pushed them into the top half of the table.

They’ve won one of their last 12 and are in freefall. They need to be smart this month, make a couple of clever signings, to stop the rot.

Motherwell have struggled in Louis Moult's absence, losing five of their last six without him

Motherwell have struggled in Louis Moult's absence, losing five of their last six without him

Motherwell have struggled in Louis Moult’s absence, losing five of their last six without him