Ice addict confronted over Clare Morrison’s 1992 murder

Clare Morrison’s battered and shark-bitten body washed up on a Victorian beach 25 years ago – and her killer is still at large.

The 13-year-old schoolgirl’s death shocked Geelong when she was found in the nearby small town of Bell Beach and the lack of closure has haunted her family.

The only lead police had was a report of her getting into a blue Commodore with two men – but by the time they discovered it was false, they had wasted months.

Clare Morrison's battered and shark-bitten body washed up on a Victorian beach 25 years ago - and the 13-year-old's killer is still at large

Clare Morrison's battered and shark-bitten body washed up on a Victorian beach 25 years ago - and the 13-year-old's killer is still at large

Clare Morrison’s battered and shark-bitten body washed up on a Victorian beach 25 years ago – and the 13-year-old’s killer is still at large

Shane McLaren, then 18, was jailed for perjury over making the false report, and is still the only man ever suspected of Clare’s murder.

‘I dunno, I was just trying to get out of the s**t,’ he said when A Current Affair tracked him down to ask about the decades-old cold case.

The self-confessed ice addict denied he killed Clare, saying when asked: ‘No, definitely not. Hell no.’

‘I woke up the next morning and got arrested for her murder. Wouldn’t have a clue [why police thought it was me].’

Mr McLaren was a friend of Morrison’s at the time and the rebellious teenager was also known to smoke cigarettes and socialise with street kids.

The self-confessed ice addict denied he killed Clare, saying when tracked down recently and asked: 'No, definitely not. Hell no'

The self-confessed ice addict denied he killed Clare, saying when tracked down recently and asked: 'No, definitely not. Hell no'

The self-confessed ice addict denied he killed Clare, saying when tracked down recently and asked: ‘No, definitely not. Hell no’

Clare was found ‘bashed, strangled, and thrown into the sea’ but her body was attacked by sharks, making it difficult for investigators.

Her body’s discovery by surfer on the beach was the first time she was seen since she told a friend she was taking a bus home to get money for Christmas shopping.

After Mr McLaren’s lead was found to be false, the trail went cold and Clare’s brother Andrew Morrison claimed police lost interest.

‘I’m sick of waiting, I’m sick of whys, and looking at pictures of my mum and sister and thinking of all the s**t they had to go through,’ he said.

‘I felt like I’d been through the most demoralising, gut-wrenching experience of my life. 

‘If a cop’s daughter was killed they wouldn’t be waiting 25 years for someone to take action.’

The 13-year-old schoolgirl's death shocked Geelong when she was found in the nearby small town of Bell Beach and the lack of closure has haunted her family

The 13-year-old schoolgirl's death shocked Geelong when she was found in the nearby small town of Bell Beach and the lack of closure has haunted her family

The 13-year-old schoolgirl’s death shocked Geelong when she was found in the nearby small town of Bell Beach and the lack of closure has haunted her family

Clare's brother Andrew wants a $50,000 reward offered for information about her murder raised significantly to encourage people to come forward

Clare's brother Andrew wants a $50,000 reward offered for information about her murder raised significantly to encourage people to come forward

Clare’s brother Andrew wants a $50,000 reward offered for information about her murder raised significantly to encourage people to come forward

His and Clare’s mother died a few years ago without ever knowing what happened to her daughter, which Mr Morrison said was incredibly hard on her.

‘It was like two life sentences for her, it was always on her mind, i could hear her crying at night for years,’ he said.

Clare’s family want a $50,000 reward offered for information about her murder raised significantly to encourage people to come forward.

They believed people who have vital information may have been teenagers too scared to come forward at the time or admit they were out after dark.

‘If there’s someone I can come before and get down on my hands and knees and beg (to raise to reward), I’ll do it,’ Mr Morrison said.

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